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Strategic behaviour in a capacity market? The new Irish electricity market design

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  • Juha Teirilä

    (Department of Economics, University Oulu, Finland)

  • Robert A. Ritz

    (Judge Business School & Energy Policy Research Group, University of Cambridge.)

Abstract

The transition to a low-carbon power system requires growing the share of generation from (intermittent) renewables while ensuring security of supply. Policymakers and economists increasingly see a capacity mechanism as a way to deal with this challenge. Yet this raises new concerns about the exercise of market power by large players via the capacity auction. We present a new modelling approach that captures such strategic behaviour together with a set of ex ante empirical estimates for the new Irish electricity market design (I-SEM) – in which a single firm controls 44% of generation capacity (excluding wind). We find significant costs of strategic behaviour, even with new entry: In our baseline scenarios, procurement costs in the capacity auction are around 150-400 million EUR (or 40-100%) above the competitive least-cost solution. From a policy perspective, we also examine how market power can be measured and mitigated through auction design.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Juha Teirilä & Robert A. Ritz, 2018. "Strategic behaviour in a capacity market? The new Irish electricity market design," Working Papers EPRG 1833, Energy Policy Research Group, Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:enp:wpaper:eprg1833
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Holmberg, P. & Ritz, R., 2019. "Capacity mechanisms and the technology mix in competitive electricity markets," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1960, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Holmberg, Pär & Tangerås, Thomas, 2021. "Strategic Reserves versus Market-wide Capacity Mechanisms," Working Paper Series 1387, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    3. Lynch, Muireann Á. & Longoria, Genora & Curtis, John, 2021. "Future market design options for electricity markets with high RES-E: lessons from the Irish Single Electricity Market," Papers WP702, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    4. Clastres, Cédric & Khalfallah, Haikel, 2021. "Dynamic pricing efficiency with strategic retailers and consumers: An analytical analysis of short-term market interactions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C).
    5. Ewa Lazarczyk & L. (Lisa B.) Ryan, 2019. "Transition to a Capacity Auction: a Case Study of Ireland," Open Access publications 10197/10915, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    6. Lynch, Muireann & Longoria, Genaro & Curtis, John, 2021. "Market design options for electricity markets with high variable renewable generation," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    7. Cédric Clastres & Haikel Khalfallah, 2020. "Retailers' strategies facing demand response and markets interactions," Working Papers hal-03167543, HAL.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    capacity market; strategic behaviour; competitive benchmark analysis; restructured electricity market; auction design;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D44 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Auctions
    • H57 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Procurement
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities

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