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Calvin's reformation in Geneva: self and social signalling

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  • Levy, Gilat
  • Razin, Ronny

Abstract

As Weber (1904) recognized, Calvinistic beliefs about predestination may constitute a powerful incentive for good works; an individual wishes to receive assurances about her future prospects of salvation, and good works may provide a positive signal about such prospects. These beliefs can in turn create a social pressure to behave well, as good works can also signal to others that individuals belong to the “elect” and are therefore likely to behave well in social interactions. Moreover, the Consistory, an institution created by Calvin to monitor and publicize individuals’ behaviour, can allow for such social signalling. We analyze these self and social signalling incentives, and show how religions affect levels of cooperation and coordination.

Suggested Citation

  • Levy, Gilat & Razin, Ronny, 2013. "Calvin's reformation in Geneva: self and social signalling," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 54256, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:54256
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McCleary, Rachel & Barro, Robert, 2003. "Religion and Economic Growth across Countries," Scholarly Articles 3708464, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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    JEL classification:

    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion

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