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Incentives, Predestination and Free Will

Author

Listed:
  • Glaeser, Edward L
  • Glendon, Spencer

Abstract

Without wholeheartedly endorsing Max Weber's views on Protestantism and economic growth, the authors present a model formalizing his claim that belief in predestination was a component in economic development. Their model suggests that belief in predestination is more effective when heterogeneity of beliefs is high, when the desire for homogeneity is high, or when accurate signals about ethics are important. Using the General Social Survey, the authors find that Protestants generally, and Presbyterians in particular, exhibit a stronger connection between individual and group behavior and between worldly success and church attendance. Copyright 1998 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Glaeser, Edward L & Glendon, Spencer, 1998. "Incentives, Predestination and Free Will," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(3), pages 429-443, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:36:y:1998:i:3:p:429-43
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dev, Pritha & Mberu, Blessing & Pongou, Roland, 2013. "Communitarianism, Oppositional Cultures, and Human Capital Contagion: Theory and Evidence from Formal versus Koranic Education," MPRA Paper 46234, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 15 Apr 2013.
    2. Benito Arrunada, "undated". "Catholic Confessions of Sin as Third Party Moral Enforcement," Gruter Institute Working Papers on Law, Economics, and Evolutionary Biology 3-1-1013, Berkeley Electronic Press.
    3. Gilat Levy & Ronny Razin, 2014. "Calvin's Reformation in Geneva: Self and Social Signalling," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 16(5), pages 730-742, October.
    4. Larbi Alaoui & Alvaro Sandroni, 2013. "Predestination and the Protestant ethic," Economics Working Papers 1350, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    5. İ. Semih Akçomak & Dinand Webbink & Bas Weel, 2016. "Why Did the Netherlands Develop So Early? The Legacy of the Brethren of the Common Life," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(593), pages 821-860, June.
    6. Benito Arruñada, 2010. "Protestants and Catholics: Similar Work Ethic, Different Social Ethic," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(547), pages 890-918, September.
    7. Pritha Dev & Blessing U. Mberu & Roland Pongou, 2016. "Ethnic Inequality: Theory and Evidence from Formal Education in Nigeria," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(4), pages 603-660.
    8. David Clingingsmith & Asim Ijaz Khwaja & Michael Kremer, 2009. "Estimating the Impact of The Hajj: Religion and Tolerance in Islam's Global Gathering," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(3), pages 1133-1170.
    9. Méon, Pierre-Guillaume & Tojerow, Ilan, 2016. "In God We Learn? Religions' Universal Messages, Context-Specific Effects, and Minority Status," IZA Discussion Papers 10077, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Shuxing Shi & Kunming Huang & Dezhu Ye & Linhui Yu, 2014. "Culture and regional economic development: Evidence from China," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(2), pages 281-299, June.
    11. repec:spr:manint:v:55:y:2015:i:1:d:10.1007_s11575-014-0216-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Ali, Mohsin & Azmi, Wajahat, 2016. "Religion in the boardroom and its impact on Islamic banks' performance," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 83-88.
    13. Larbi Alaoui & Alvaro Sandroni, 2013. "Predestination and the Protestant Ethic," Working Papers 679, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    14. repec:rfa:bmsjnl:v:4:y:2018:i:1:p:81-95 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Charles H. Breeden & Noreen E. Lephardt, 2002. "Student Attitudes Towards the Market System : An Inquiry and Analysis," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 17(Spring 20), pages 153-171.

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