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Diving into Dark Pools

Author

Listed:
  • Buti, Sabrina

    (University of Toronto)

  • Rindi, Barbara

    (IGIER and Carefin)

  • Werner, Ingrid M.

    (Ohio State University)

Abstract

This paper examines unique data on dark pool activity for a large cross-section of US stocks in 2009. Dark pool activity is concentrated in large firms, stocks with high share volume, high price, low spreads, high depth, and low short-term volatility. NASDAQ (AMEX) stocks have significantly higher (lower) dark pool activity than NYSE stocks controlling for size, share volume, and price. For a given stock, dark pool activity is significantly higher on days with higher share volume, higher depth, and lower intraday volatility. Dark pool activity is significantly lower for days with larger order imbalances relative to share volume and larger absolute returns. We find no evidence supporting the hypothesis that dark pool activity has a detrimental effect on market quality.

Suggested Citation

  • Buti, Sabrina & Rindi, Barbara & Werner, Ingrid M., 2010. "Diving into Dark Pools," Working Paper Series 2010-10, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:ohidic:2010-10
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    File URL: http://www.cob.ohio-state.edu/fin/dice/papers/2010/2010-10.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Katarzyna Bień-Barkowska, 2014. "“Every move you make, every step you take, I’ll be watching you” – the quest for hidden orders in the interbank FX spot market," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 45(3), pages 197-224.
    2. Sabrina Buti & Barbara Rindi & Ingrid M. Werner, 2011. "Dark Pool Trading Strategies," Working Papers 421, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    3. Fleming, Michael J. & Nguyen, Giang, 2013. "Order flow segmentation and the role of dark trading in the price discovery of U.S. treasury securities," Staff Reports 624, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, revised 01 Aug 2015.
    4. Sabrina Buti & Barbara Rindi & Ingrid M. Werner, 2014. "Dark Pool Trading Strategies, Market Quality and Welfare," Working Papers 530, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    5. Rasmeet Kohli, 2014. "Market fragmentation of securities market: traditional exchanges versus alternate trading venues," Macroeconomics and Finance in Emerging Market Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(2), pages 303-314, September.
    6. Degryse, H.A. & de Jong, F.C.J.M. & van Kervel, V.L., 2011. "The Impact of Dark and Visible Fragmentation on Market Quality (Replaces CentER Discussion Paper 2011-051)," Discussion Paper 2011-069, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    7. Gomber, Peter & Sagade, Satchit & Theissen, Erik & Weber, Moritz Christian & Westheide, Christian, 2013. "Competition/fragmentation in equities markets: A literature survey," SAFE Working Paper Series 35, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    8. Hans Degryse & Frank de Jong & Vincent van Kervel, 2015. "The Impact of Dark Trading and Visible Fragmentation on Market Quality," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 19(4), pages 1587-1622.
    9. Nimalendran, Mahendrarajah & Ray, Sugata, 2014. "Informational linkages between dark and lit trading venues," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 230-261.
    10. Philippe De Peretti & Oren Tapiero, 2014. "A GARCH analysis of dark-pool trades," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00984834, HAL.
    11. van Kervel, V.L., 2013. "Competition between stock exchanges and optimal trading," Other publications TiSEM 5c608a0f-527d-441d-a910-e, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.

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