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Les priorités de la prise en charge financière des soins. Une approche par la philosophie du besoin

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  • Philippe Batifoulier
  • John Latsis
  • Jacques Merchiers

Abstract

The concept of need plays an essential role in defining legitimate health inequalities. The debate on equity in healthcare policy has so far evolved independently of the philosophical discussions of need. This article draws on moral and political philosophy in order to develop a conception of need that goes beyond the current dichotomy between universal lists and individual preferences. We build on Wiggins’ and Hamiltons’ insights in an attempt to further develop an institutionalist health economics. Our contribution suggests that (against mainstream economics and the dominant trends imported from moral philosophy) needs must be determined by explicitly political processes of negotiation and conventions. We propose an institutionalist approach to needs that emphasises the role of social processes in creating and consolidating specific and situated healthcare needs.

Suggested Citation

  • Philippe Batifoulier & John Latsis & Jacques Merchiers, 2010. "Les priorités de la prise en charge financière des soins. Une approche par la philosophie du besoin," EconomiX Working Papers 2010-2, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
  • Handle: RePEc:drm:wpaper:2010-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Healthcare needs; Health care priority setting; Equity; Institutionalist economics; Philosophy of economics;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary

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