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Disuguaglianze nella durata della vita per grado d'istruzione in Italia all'inizio degli anni 2000

  • Carlo Maccheroni
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    This paper presents measures of differential mortality in Italy by educational level. The results refer to the year 2001 because the census is the only source providing data about population by level of education; as to deaths the data are provided by death certificates. As often happens, in order to compute differential mortality using these period frequencies it was necessary to confront problems both in the use of unlinked records and in relation to limitations in statistical documents; that is why we classified the population in only two groups: one with a low level of education and the other with a high level. We used a logit relational method to build life tables according to the levels of education. Particular attention was given to expectation of life at the ages from 35 to 65. At 35 years of age the expectation of life for a person with a low level of education is about 7.5 years less than for a person of a higher level in case of a male, and 6.5 years less in case of a female. The tendency continues, and at the age of 65 the expectation for those with a lower level is one quarter less in case of males and one fifth less in case of females. We found that a linear relationship exists between life expectancy and standardized rates among the Italian provinces; the same relation is also true for the analogous indicators of differential mortality by educational level.

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    Paper provided by "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi in its series Working Papers with number 003.

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    Length: 22 pages
    Date of creation: Jun 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:don:donwpa:003
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    1. Balsa, Ana I. & McGuire, Thomas G., 2001. "Statistical discrimination in health care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 881-907, November.
    2. Cardano, Mario & Costa, Giuseppe & Demaria, Moreno, 2004. "Social mobility and health in the Turin longitudinal study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(8), pages 1563-1574, April.
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