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Minerals, Openness, Institutions and Growth: An Empirical Analysis

Author

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  • James L. Butkiewicz

    () (Department of Economics,University of Delaware)

  • Halit Yanikkaya

    ()

Abstract

Empirical evidence from a panel-data analysis indicates that a mineral resource curse exists for certain developing countries, but not for developed countries. Countries with weak institutions are cursed, while developing countries with strong institution are able to avoid the curse. These results are consistent the hypothesis that owners of mineral resources use weak institutions and openness to trade to stifle the development of human capital, to the detriment of growth of other sectors of the economy. Imports of manufactured goods substitute for the development of domestic manufacturing, so openness to trade correlates with lower growth in mineral dependent countries.

Suggested Citation

  • James L. Butkiewicz & Halit Yanikkaya, 2007. "Minerals, Openness, Institutions and Growth: An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers 07-04, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:dlw:wpaper:07-04.
    as

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    File URL: http://graduate.lerner.udel.edu/sites/default/files/ECON/PDFs/RePEc/dlw/WorkingPapers/2007/UDWP2007-04.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Asghar Mobarak & Ali Karshenasan, 2012. "The Impact of Institutional Quality on Relation between Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," Iranian Economic Review, Economics faculty of Tehran university, vol. 17(2), pages 95-110, spring.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mineral Resources; Institutional Quality; Economics Growth;

    JEL classification:

    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O50 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - General

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