IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/diw/diwwpp/dp692.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Learning-by-Doing in the Renewable Energy Equipment Industry or in Renewable Electricity Production: Why Does It Matter to Differentiate?

Author

Listed:
  • Katja Schumacher
  • Michael Kohlhaas

Abstract

In economic models of energy and climate policy, endogenous technological change is generally introduced as the result of either investment in research-and-development or of learning-by-doing. In this paper, we analyze alternative ways of modeling learning-by-doing in the renewable energy sector in a top-down CGE model. Conventionally, learning-by-doing effects in the renewable energy sector are allocated to the production of renewable based electricity. We build on the observation that learning-by-doing also takes place in sectors that deliver capital goods to the renewable electricity sector, in particular in the production of machinery and equipment for renewable energy technologies. We therefore implement learning-by-doing alternatively in the renewable energy equipment industry and in renewable electricity production and show why it matters to differentiate between these two approaches. The main differences originate from effects on international trade, since the output of the machinery and equipment sector is intensively traded on international markets unlike renewable electricity.

Suggested Citation

  • Katja Schumacher & Michael Kohlhaas, 2007. "Learning-by-Doing in the Renewable Energy Equipment Industry or in Renewable Electricity Production: Why Does It Matter to Differentiate?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 692, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp692
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.57363.de/dp692.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alwyn Young, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," NBER Working Papers 3577, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Alwyn Young, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 369-405.
    3. Vollebergh, Herman R.J. & Kemfert, Claudia, 2005. "The role of technological change for a sustainable development," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2-3), pages 133-147, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Joan Canton & Åsa Johannesson Lindén, 2010. "Support schemes for renewable electricity in the EU," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 408, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Learning-by-doing; wind energy; general equilibrium modeling; international trade;

    JEL classification:

    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp692. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Bibliothek). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/diwbede.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.