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Voting for Direct Democracy: Evidence from a Unique Popular Initiative in Bavaria

Author

Listed:
  • Felix Arnold
  • Ronny Freier
  • Magdalena Pallauf
  • David Stadelmann

Abstract

We analyze a constitutional change in the German State of Bavaria where citizens, not politicians, granted themselves more say in politics at the local level through a constitutional initiative at the state level. This institutional setting allows us to focus on revealed preferences for direct democracy and to identify factors which explain this preference. Empirical results suggests support for direct democracy is rather related to dissatisfaction with representative democracy in general than with an elected governing party.

Suggested Citation

  • Felix Arnold & Ronny Freier & Magdalena Pallauf & David Stadelmann, 2014. "Voting for Direct Democracy: Evidence from a Unique Popular Initiative in Bavaria," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1435, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1435
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    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.492400.de/dp1435.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Direct democracy; Voting; Initiative; Parties;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • H70 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - General

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