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Does Gender Affect Funding Success at the Peer-to-Peer Credit Markets?: Evidence from the Largest German Lending Platform


  • Nataliya Barasinska
  • Dorothea Schäfer


Studies of peer-to-peer lending in the USA find that female borrowers have better chances of getting funds than males. Is differential treatment of borrowers of different sexes a common feature of peer-to-peer lendingmarkets or is it subject to specific businessmodels, ways of fixing loan contracts and even national financial systems? We aim at answering this question by providing evidence on loan procurement at the largest German peer-to-peer lending platform Our results show that gender does not affect individual borrower's chances of funding success on this platform, ceteris paribus. Hence, gender discrimination seems to be a platform-specific phenomenon rather than a common attribute of this innovative form of credit markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Nataliya Barasinska & Dorothea Schäfer, 2010. "Does Gender Affect Funding Success at the Peer-to-Peer Credit Markets?: Evidence from the Largest German Lending Platform," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1094, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1094

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    More about this item


    gender; access to credit; peer-to-peer lending;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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