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The near impossibility of credit rationing

  • David de Meza
  • David C. Webb

Equilibrium credit rationing in the sense of Stiglitz and Weiss (1981) implies the marginal cost of funds to the borrower is infinite. So borrowers have an overwhelming incentive to cut their loan by a dollar and thereby avoiding being rationed. Ways of doing this include scaling down the project, cutting consumption or infinitesimally delaying the project to accumulate more saving. All of these routes are normally feasible in which case credit rationing is impossible.

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File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/24858/
File Function: Open access version.
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Paper provided by London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library in its series LSE Research Online Documents on Economics with number 24858.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:24858
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Web page: http://www.lse.ac.uk/

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  1. Simon Parker, 2000. "Saving to Overcome Borrowing Constraints: Implications for Small Business Entry and Exit," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 223-232, November.
  2. Bester, Helmut, 1985. "Screening vs. Rationing in Credit Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 850-55, September.
  3. Douglas Holtz-Eakin & David Joulfaian & Harvey Rosen, 1992. "Entrepreneurial Decisions and Liquidity Constraints," Working Papers 679, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  4. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
  5. Berger, Allen N & Udell, Gregory F, 1992. "Some Evidence on the Empirical Significance of Credit Rationing," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(5), pages 1047-77, October.
  6. de Meza, David & Webb, David C, 1987. "Too Much Investment: A Problem of Asymmetric Information," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 102(2), pages 281-92, May.
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