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Increased Opportunity to Move up the Economic Ladder?: Earnings Mobility in EU: 1994-2001

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  • Denisa Maria Sologon
  • Cathal O'Donoghue

Abstract

Do EU citizens have an increased opportunity to improve their position in the distribution of earnings over time? This question is answered by exploring short and long-term wage mobility for males across 14 EU countries between 1994 and 2001 using ECHP. Mobility is evaluated using rank measures which capture positional movements in the distribution of earnings. All countries recording an increase in cross-sectional inequality recorded also a decrease in short-term mobility. Among countries where inequality decreased, short-term mobility increased in Denmark, Spain, Ireland and UK, and decreased in Belgium, France and Ireland. Long-term mobility is higher than short-term mobility, but long-term persistency is still high in all countries. The lowest long-term mobility is found in Luxembourg followed by four clusters: first, Spain, France and Germany; second, Netherlands, and Portugal; third, UK, Italy and Austria; forth, Greece, Finland, Belgium and Ireland. The highest long-term mobility is recorded in Denmark.

Suggested Citation

  • Denisa Maria Sologon & Cathal O'Donoghue, 2009. "Increased Opportunity to Move up the Economic Ladder?: Earnings Mobility in EU: 1994-2001," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 221, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp221
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    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.341695.de/diw_sp0221.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter Gottschalk & Enrico Spolaore, 2002. "On the Evaluation of Economic Mobility," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(1), pages 191-208.
    2. Fields, Gary S. & Leary, Jesse B. & Ok, Efe A., 2002. "Stochastic dominance in mobility analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 333-339, May.
    3. Aaberge, Rolf, et al, 2002. "Income Inequality and Income Mobility in the Scandinavian Countries Compared to the United States," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(4), pages 443-469, December.
    4. Fields, Gary S. & Ok, Efe A., 1996. "The Measurement of Income Mobility: An Introduction to the Literature," Working Papers 96-05, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
    5. Dickens, Richard, 2000. "Caught in a Trap? Wage Mobility in Great Britain: 1975-1994," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 67(268), pages 477-497, November.
    6. Creedy, John & Wilhelm, Mark, 2002. "Income Mobility, Inequality and Social Welfare," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(2), pages 140-150, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sologon, Denisa Maria & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2009. "Equalizing or Disequalizing Lifetime Earnings Differentials? Earnings Mobility in the EU: 1994-2001," IZA Discussion Papers 4642, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Denisa Maria Sologon & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2011. "Earnings Mobility in Europe: 1994-2001 : Do more flexible labour markets experience a higher earnings mobility?," MERIT Working Papers 070, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    3. Sologon, Denisa Maria & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2010. "Earnings Dynamics and Inequality among Men in Luxembourg, 1988-2004: Evidence from Administrative Data," IZA Discussion Papers 5014, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Panel data; wage distribution; inequality; mobility;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

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