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Monitoring Job Offer Decisions, Punishments, Exit to Work, and Job Quality

  • van den Berg, Gerard J
  • Vikström, Johan

Unemployment insurance systems include monitoring of unemployed workers and punitive sanctions if job search requirements are violated. We analyze the effect of sanctions on the ensuing job quality, notably on wage rates and hours worked, and we examine how often a sanction leads to a lower occupational level. The data cover the Swedish population over 1999-2004. We estimate duration models dealing with selection on unobservables. We use weighted exogenous sampling maximum likelihood to deal with the fact the data register is large whereas observed punishments are rare. We also develop a theoretical job search model with monitoring of job offer rejection vis-a-vis monitoring of job search effort. The observation window includes a policy change in which the punishment severity was reduced. We find that the hourly wage and the number of hours are on average lower after a sanction, and that individuals move more often to a lower occupational level, incurring human capital losses. Monitoring offer rejections is less effective than monitoring search effort.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 7460.

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Date of creation: Sep 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7460
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  1. Ham, John C & LaLonde, Robert J, 1996. "The Effect of Sample Selection and Initial Conditions in Duration Models: Evidence from Experimental Data on Training," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(1), pages 175-205, January.
  2. Gaure, Simen & Røed, Knut & Zhang, Tao, 2005. "Time and Causality: A Monte Carlo Assessment of the Timing-of-Events Approach," Memorandum 19/2005, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  3. Bennmarker, Helge & Carling, Kenneth & Holmlund, Bertil, 2005. "Do benefit hikes damage job finding? Evidence from Swedish unemployment insurance reforms," Working Paper Series 2005:22, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  4. Ljungqvist, Lars & Sargent, Thomas J., 1997. "The European Unemployment Dilemma," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 178, Stockholm School of Economics.
  5. David Gray, 2003. "National Versus Regional Financing and Management of Unemployment and Related Benefits: The Case of Canada," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 14, OECD Publishing.
  6. Svarer, Michael, 2007. "The Effect of Sanctions on the Job Finding Rate: Evidence from Denmark," IZA Discussion Papers 3015, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Daron Acemoglu & Robert Shimer, 1999. "Productivity Gains from Unemployment Insurance," NBER Working Papers 7352, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  9. Imbens, G.W. & Lancaster, T., 1991. "Efficient estimation and stratified sampling," Discussion Paper 1991-45, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  10. Berg, Gerard J. van den & Klaauw, Bas van der & Ours, Jan C. van, 1998. "Punitive sanctions and the transition rate from welfare to work," Serie Research Memoranda 0033, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
  11. Jaap Abbring & Gerard Van Den Berg, 2005. "Social experiments and instrumental variables with duration outcomes," IFS Working Papers W05/19, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  12. Manski, Charles F & Lerman, Steven R, 1977. "The Estimation of Choice Probabilities from Choice Based Samples," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(8), pages 1977-88, November.
  13. Jaap H. Abbring & Gerard J. van den Berg, 2005. "Social Experiments and Instrumental Variables with Duration Outcomes," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-047/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  14. Takeshi Amemiya & Xinghua Yu, 2006. "Endogenous Sampling and Matching Method in Duration Models," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 24(2), pages 1-32, November.
  15. van den Berg, Gerard J & van der Klaauw, Bas, 2001. "Counselling and Monitoring of Unemployed Workers: Theory and Evidence from a Controlled Social Experiment," CEPR Discussion Papers 2986, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  16. repec:dgr:uvatin:2005047 is not listed on IDEAS
  17. Jaap H. Abbring & Gerard J. Berg & Jan C. Ours, 2005. "The Effect of Unemployment Insurance Sanctions on the Transition Rate from Unemployment to Employment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(505), pages 602-630, 07.
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