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The Macroeconomic, Industrial, Distributional and Regional Effects of Government Spending Programs in South Africa

Author

Listed:
  • J. Mark Horridge
  • Brian R. Parmenter
  • Martin Cameron
  • Riaan Joubert
  • Areef Suleman
  • Dawie de Jongh

Abstract

A computable general equilibrium model of the South African economy (IDC-GEM) is outlined. The model is used to analyse the effects on the economy of increases in government spending such as are at the core of the new government's Reconstruction and Development Program. The analysis concentrates on the implications of alternative methods of finance for the program. Results are reported for macroeconomic variables, for the prospects of industries and regions, and for income distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • J. Mark Horridge & Brian R. Parmenter & Martin Cameron & Riaan Joubert & Areef Suleman & Dawie de Jongh, 1995. "The Macroeconomic, Industrial, Distributional and Regional Effects of Government Spending Programs in South Africa," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-109, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  • Handle: RePEc:cop:wpaper:g-109
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sudarshan Chalise & Dr Athula Naranpanawa, 2016. "Climate change adaptation in agriculture: A general equilibrium analysis of land re-allocation in Nepal," EcoMod2016 9272, EcoMod.
    2. Bodrun Nahar & Mahinda Siriwardana, 2013. "Trade Opening, Fiscal Reforms, Poverty, and Inequality: A CGE Analysis for Bangladesh," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 51(2), pages 145-185, June.
    3. Buetre, Benjamin L. & Ahmadi-Esfahani, Fredoun Z., 2000. "Updating an input-output table for use in policy analysis," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 44(4), December.
    4. Jayatilleke S. Bandara & Athula Naranpanawa, 2015. "Garment Industry in Sri Lanka and the Removal of GSP Plus by EU," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(9), pages 1438-1461, September.
    5. Rodriguez, U-Primo E., 2007. "State-of-the-Art in Regional Computable General Equilibrium Modelling with a Case Study of the Philippines," Agricultural Economics Research Review, Agricultural Economics Research Association (India), vol. 20(1).
    6. Liyanaarachchi, Tilak Susantha & Bandara, Layatilleke S. & Naranpanawa, Athula, 2014. "A Quantitive Evaluation of the Potential Effects of Trade Policy Reversal in Sri Lanka: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Analysis," Sri Lankan Journal of Agricultural Economics, Sri Lanka Agricultural Economics Association (SAEA), vol. 16.
    7. Naranpanawa, Athula & Bandara, Jayatilleke S. & Selvanathan, Saroja, 2011. "Trade and poverty nexus: A case study of Sri Lanka," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 328-346, March.
    8. Liyanaarachchi, Tilak S. & Naranpanawa, Athula & Bandara, Jayatilleke S., 2016. "Impact of trade liberalisation on labour market and poverty in Sri Lanka. An integrated macro-micro modelling approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 102-115.
    9. Chalise, Sudarshan & Naranpanawa, Athula & Bandara, Jayatilleke S. & Sarker, Tapan, 2017. "A general equilibrium assessment of climate change–induced loss of agricultural productivity in Nepal," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 43-50.
    10. Naranpanawa, Athula & Bandara, Jayatilleke S., 2012. "Poverty and growth impacts of high oil prices: Evidence from Sri Lanka," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 102-111.
    11. Esmedekh Lkhanaajav, 2016. "CoPS-style CGE modelling and analysis," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-264, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic modelling; South Africa; government spending; income distribution; industrial effects; regional effects; macroeconomic effects;

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • R13 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General Equilibrium and Welfare Economic Analysis of Regional Economies

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