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The effect of education on in-prison conflict: evidence from Argentina

Author

Listed:
  • Edgar Villa
  • María Laura Alzúa
  • Catherine Rodríguez

Abstract

Using census data for Argentine prisons for the period 2002-2005, this paperpresents evidence of the positive e¤ect that prisoner education programs (pri-mary and some part of secondary schooling) have on in prison conflictivitymeasured as sanctions or violent behavior of the prisoner. In order to over-come the problems of endogeneity that education decisions generate we usean instrumental variables approach. Our results show a decrease in partici-pation in violent conflicts and bad behavior which can be partially attributedto education.

Suggested Citation

  • Edgar Villa & María Laura Alzúa & Catherine Rodríguez, 2008. "The effect of education on in-prison conflict: evidence from Argentina," Documentos de Economía 004546, Universidad Javeriana - Bogotá.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000108:004546
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    File URL: http://www.javeriana.edu.co/fcea/area_economia/inv/documents/TheEffectofEducationonIn-prisonConfict_000.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John H. Tyler & Jeffrey R. Kling, 2004. "Prison-Based Education and Re-Entry into the Mainstream Labor Market," Working Papers 12, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    2. Lance Lochner & Enrico Moretti, 2004. "The Effect of Education on Crime: Evidence from Prison Inmates, Arrests, and Self-Reports," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 155-189, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    prison based education; violent behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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