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Toward Results-Based Social Policy Design and Implementation - Working Paper 249

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  • Miguel Szekely

Abstract

In the last decade, efforts to systematically study the effectiveness of programs in developing countries have expanded dramatically. In this paper, Miguel Székely, director of the Institute for Innovation in Education at Tecnológico de Monterrey, shows how Mexico has improved the evidence base for public policy in a number of ways. He explains the difficulties of conducting good impact evaluations and assesses the interests of key stakeholders in promoting or opposing the creation and use of evidence. He draws out lessons from the government’s effort to evaluate a major antipoverty program (PROGRESA-Oportunidades), publish politically sensitive poverty data, introduce performance measurement in education, and institutionalize learning. He concludes with a proposal for how developing countries could systematically incorporate evidence in policymaking.

Suggested Citation

  • Miguel Szekely, 2011. "Toward Results-Based Social Policy Design and Implementation - Working Paper 249," Working Papers 249, Center for Global Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:cgd:wpaper:249
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    File URL: http://www.cgdev.org/files/1425010_file_Szekely_Results_Based_Social_Policy_FINAL.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Paul Resnick & Christopher Avery & Richard Zeckhauser, 1999. "The Market for Evaluations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 564-584, June.
    2. James J. Heckman & Jeffrey Smith & Nancy Clements, 1997. "Making The Most Out Of Programme Evaluations and Social Experiments: Accounting For Heterogeneity in Programme Impacts," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 487-535.
    3. Angus Deaton, 2010. "Understanding the Mechanisms of Economic Development," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 3-16, Summer.
    4. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Woessmann, 2007. "The Role of School Improvement in Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 12832, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Daron Acemoglu, 2010. "Theory, General Equilibrium, and Political Economy in Development Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 17-32, Summer.
    6. Marie Gaarder & Amanda Glassman & Jessica Todd, 2010. "Conditional cash transfers and health: unpacking the causal chain," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 6-50.
    7. Laura B. Rawlings, 2005. "Evaluating the Impact of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 20(1), pages 29-55.
    8. Lant Pritchett, 2002. "It pays to be ignorant: A simple political economy of rigorous program evaluation," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 251-269.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Pritchett, Lant & Samji, Salimah & Hammer, Jeffrey S., 2012. "It's All about MeE: Using Structured Experiential Learning ('e') to Crawl the Design Space," WIDER Working Paper Series 104, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Lant Pritchett & Salimah Samji & Jeffrey Hammer, 2013. "It‘s All About MeE: Using Structured Experiential Learning (“e”) to Crawl the Design Space," Working Papers 322, Center for Global Development.

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    Keywords

    social policy; human development; results-based;

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