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Hurricanes? Let's Make a Move

Author

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  • Nekeisha Spencer
  • Mikhail-Ann Urquhart

Abstract

This paper establishes the relationship between migration and hurricanes in the Central American and Caribbean region. In contrast to previous studies, we employ hurricane destruction indices to study this relationship. These indices measure geographical destruction which gives us a more comprehensive and accurate view of damage and impact that it has on the movement of people to international destinations. Our estimates reveal that on average hurricane increases migration. We also find that the impact is greater when a hurricane hits a country directly as opposed to not making landfall. These results have policy implications for long term economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Nekeisha Spencer & Mikhail-Ann Urquhart, 2016. "Hurricanes? Let's Make a Move," CESifo Working Paper Series 6081, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_6081
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wim Naudé, 2009. "Natural Disasters and International Migration from Sub-Saharan Africa," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 6(2), pages 165-176, October.
    2. Strobl, Eric, 2012. "The economic growth impact of natural disasters in developing countries: Evidence from hurricane strikes in the Central American and Caribbean regions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(1), pages 130-141.
    3. Grote, Ulrike & Engel, Stefanie & Schraven, Benjamin, 2006. "Migration due to the tsunami in Sri Lanka - Analyzing vulnerability and migration at the household level," Discussion Papers 7117, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    4. Drabo, Alassane & Mbaye, Linguère Mously, 2015. "Natural disasters, migration and education: an empirical analysis in developing countries," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(6), pages 767-796, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alistair Munro & Shunsuke Managi, 2017. "Going Back: Radiation and Intentions to Return amongst Households Evacuated after the Great Tohoku Earthquake," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 77-93, June.

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