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Dynamic Voting in Clubs

  • Kevin Roberts

This paper examines the process and outcomes of democratic decision-making in clubs where a club is defined by their sets of members whose preferences and decisions relate to the set of members in the club: the electorate to endogenous. Examples range from international organizations like the European Union and NATO to firms, workers' cooperatives and trade unions. Although the policy space is infinite, a majority voting equilibrium exists under plausible conditions and the equilibrium rule and the dynamics of clubs are characterised. Two types of club, one where a group funds some public good and the other where a given benefit is shared by the group, are analysed in detail.

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File URL: http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/te/te367.pdf
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Paper provided by Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE in its series STICERD - Theoretical Economics Paper Series with number 367.

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Date of creation: Jan 1999
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Handle: RePEc:cep:stitep:367
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/default.asp

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  1. Drew Fudenberg & Jean Tirole, 1991. "Game Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262061414, August.
  2. Leininger, Wolfgang, 1986. "The Existence of Perfect Equilibria in a Model of Growth with Altruism between Generations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(3), pages 349-67, July.
  3. Klevorick, Alvin K. & Kramer, Gerald H., 1973. "Social choice on pollution management: the genossenschaften," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 101-146, April.
  4. Ng, Yew-Kwang, 1973. "The Economic Theory of Clubs: Pareto Optimality Conditions," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 40(159), pages 291-98, August.
  5. Layard, R., 1989. "Lay-Offs By Seniority And Equilibrium Employment," Papers 346, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
  6. Krusell, P. & Rios-Rull, J.V., 1993. "Vested Interests in a Positive Theory of Stagnation and Growth," Papers 547, Stockholm - International Economic Studies.
  7. Caplin, Andrew S & Nalebuff, Barry J, 1988. "On 64%-Majority Rule," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(4), pages 787-814, July.
  8. Gans, Joshua S. & Smart, Michael, 1996. "Majority voting with single-crossing preferences," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 219-237, February.
  9. Roberts, Kevin W. S., 1977. "Voting over income tax schedules," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 329-340, December.
  10. Kevin Roberts, 1989. "The Theory of Union Behaviour: Labour Hoarding and Endogenous Hysteresis," STICERD - Theoretical Economics Paper Series 209, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  11. Moore, John, 1988. "Contracting between Two Parties with Private Information," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 49-69, January.
  12. Grandmont, Jean-Michel, 1978. "Intermediate Preferences and the Majority Rule," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(2), pages 317-30, March.
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