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Regulatory Entry Barriers and Trade

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  • Tobal, Martin

Abstract

This paper develops a New Trade Theory model modified with entry barriers, thereby creating a link between the traditional interests of development and industrial organization economists and research on international trade. I show that entry barriers cause the market size to become endogenous by creating rents. Furthermore, I prove that the endogeneity of market size has four implications. First, governments can use trade policy to shift foreign rents to their countries and enlarge their home markets. Second, endogenous market size magnifies the standard home-market effect. Third, the endogeneity of market size interferes with the unambiguous Pareto optimality of trade agreements. In particular, if rents are suffciently large and the country size is suffciently small, a trade agreement will negatively affect the country in question. Therefore, I consider a new research question: what are consequences of trade agreements in terms of welfare redistribution? Finally, I show that an increase in entry barriers increases the market size of large countries. If the market size increase is suffciently large, the country benefits. These results challenge the idea that higher entry barriers decrease welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Tobal, Martin, 2011. "Regulatory Entry Barriers and Trade," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt6k8954nn, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:ucsdec:qt6k8954nn
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    1. Gene M. Grossman & Edwin L.-C. Lai, 2004. "International Protection of Intellectual Property," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1635-1653, December.
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    5. Dixit, Avinash, 1984. "International Trade Policy for Oligopolistic Industries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(376a), pages 1-16, Supplemen.
    6. Antonio Ciccone & Elias Papaioannou, 2007. "Red Tape and Delayed Entry," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(2-3), pages 444-458, 04-05.
    7. Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, & Philip R. Lane, 2003. "International Financial Integration," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp03, IIIS.
    8. Robert C. Feenstra & Zhiyuan Li & Miaojie Yu, 2014. "Exports and Credit Constraints under Incomplete Information: Theory and Evidence from China," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(4), pages 729-744, October.
    9. Brander, James A. & Spencer, Barbara J., 1985. "Export subsidies and international market share rivalry," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 83-100.
    10. John Romalis, 2004. "Factor Proportions and the Structure of Commodity Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 67-97, March.
    11. Geroski, P. A., 1995. "What do we know about entry?," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 421-440, December.
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    Keywords

    international trade; macro; Social and Behavioral Sciences;

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