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Reforms and Growth in MENA Countries:New Empirical Evidence

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  • Marie-Ange VEGANZONES-VAROUDAKIS

    () (Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International(CERDI))

  • Mustapha Kamel NABLI

Abstract

In this paper we empirically analyze the linkages among economic reforms, human capital, physical infrastructure, and growth for a panel of 44 developing countries over 1970-80 to 1999. For this purpose, we generate aggregated reform indicators using principal component analysis. We show that the growth performance of the MENA region has been disappointing because these economies have lagged behind in terms of economic reforms. However, our analysis also reveals that the growth dividend of some reforms has been small. This is the case when structural reforms are implemented in an unstable macroeconomic environment (which corresponds to the situation of the MENA countries in the 1980s), and when macroeconomic reforms are accompanied by a low level of structural reforms (as observed during the 1990s). Our result illustrates the complementarities between reforms as modeled by Mussa (1987) and Williamson (1994). Actually, after human capital and physical infrastructure, our analysis finds that macroeconomic and external stability are key variables for the reform process and for the growth prospects of the developing world.

Suggested Citation

  • Marie-Ange VEGANZONES-VAROUDAKIS & Mustapha Kamel NABLI, 2004. "Reforms and Growth in MENA Countries:New Empirical Evidence," Working Papers 200431, CERDI.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdi:wpaper:855
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Khalid Sekkat & Marie-Ange Veganzones, 2004. "Trade and foreign exchange liberalization, investment climate and FDI in the MENA countries," Working Papers CEB 04-023.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    2. World Bank, 2006. "Fostering Higher Growth and Employment in the Kingdom of Morocco," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7114.
    3. Khalid Sekkat & Marie-Ange Veganzones, 2005. "Trade and foreign exchange liberalization, investment climate and FDI in the MENA," DULBEA Working Papers 05-06.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    4. repec:khe:scajes:v:3:y:2017:i:2:p:76-87 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Ben Hammouda, Hakim & Oulmane, Nassim & Bchir, Hédi & Sadni Jallab, Mustapha, 2006. "The Cost of non-Maghreb: Achieving the Gains from Economic Integration," MPRA Paper 13293, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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