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Persistent and Transitory Shocks, Learning, and Investment Dynamics

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Abstract

This paper introduces a new approach to understanding investment. The distinctive feature of our approach is that shocks to the economic fundamentals have both persistent and transitory components, and that firms must disentangle the persistent from the transitory shocks. The model generates interesting dynamics. Simulations of the model show that the response of investment to changes in the interest rate can vary widely over time, that the current response of investment depends on the sequence of past shocks, that investment will respond less when the firm is confident about its beliefs and more when a change in economic fundamentals challenges the firm's beliefs, and that investment booms and crashes may occur without any change in the true state of the economy. Simulations of the model also show that it captures many "stylized facts" of investment dynamics documented in previous empirical studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Bartholomew Moore & Huntley Schaller, 2001. "Persistent and Transitory Shocks, Learning, and Investment Dynamics," Carleton Economic Papers 01-02, Carleton University, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2002.
  • Handle: RePEc:car:carecp:01-02
    Note: (figures not included in e-file) We are grateful to R. Chirinko, Michel & Fanny Demers, Avinash Dixit, Brian Erard, John Leahy, Bengt Lucke, Bruce Mizrach, Martin Zagler, and seminar participants at the American Economic Association, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Carleton University, Econometric Society, Georgetown University, HWWA - Institute for Economic Research (Hamburg), Institute for Advanced Studies (Vienna), University of Oregon, Rutgers University, and the Society for Nonlinear Dynamics and Economics for helpful discussion and comments. Any errors are our own.
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    File URL: http://www1.carleton.ca/economics/research/working-papers/carleton-economic-papers-cep-2001-2010/
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    Cited by:

    1. Buranavityawut, Nonthipoth & Freeman, Mark C. & Freeman, Nisih, 2006. "Has the equity premium been low for 40 years?," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 191-205, August.
    2. Yang, Insun & Koveos, Peter & Barkley, Tom, 2015. "Permanent sales increase and investment," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 15-33.
    3. Byrne, Joseph P. & Davis, E. Philip, 2004. "Permanent and temporary inflation uncertainty and investment in the United States," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 271-277, November.
    4. Wilman Gómez & Carlos Esteban Posada, 2004. "Un "Choque" del Activo Externo Neto y el Ciclo Económico Colombiano," Borradores de Economia 285, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    5. Ho, Sin-Yu & Njindan Iyke, Bernard, 2017. "Consumption and Exchange Rate Uncertainty: Evidence from Selected Asian Countries," MPRA Paper 80096, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Emine Boz, 2009. "Can Miracles Lead to Crises? The Role of Optimism in Emerging Markets Crises," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(6), pages 1189-1215, September.
    7. Waters, George A., 2007. "Regime changes, learning and monetary policy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 255-282, June.
    8. Emine Boz, 2006. "Can Miracles Lead to Crises? An Informational Frictions Explanation of Emerging Markets Crises," Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 19, Society for Computational Economics.
    9. repec:eee:macchp:v2-163 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Investment; learning; macroeconomic dynamics;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity

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