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An Investigation of Editorial Favoritism in the AER

Author

Listed:
  • Philip R. P. Coelho

    () (Department of Economics, Ball State University)

  • James McClure

    () (Department of Economics, Ball State University)

Abstract

This paper adds to the literature on the credibility of academic research by examining the hypothesis that the selection procedures of academic journals in economics favor submissions that frequently cite editorial insiders. We use procedures, a sample size, and methods that offset some of the limitations that accompanied previous investigations. Using the expanded sample and controls we find that citations to insiders in articles in the American Economic Review increased the frequency of citations in non-AER journals. The evidence is robust; our findings contradict those in previous research. Given our metric, sample, and procedures, we find no significant support for the hypothesis of editorial favoritism.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip R. P. Coelho & James McClure, 2012. "An Investigation of Editorial Favoritism in the AER," Working Papers 201203, Ball State University, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:bsu:wpaper:201203
    as

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    File URL: https://ballstate.box.com/s/iy27h5xnozpiqk36cmiu6jfxmfy8gy2r
    File Function: First version, 2012
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Leamer, Edward E, 1985. "Sensitivity Analyses Would Help," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 308-313, June.
    2. Laband, David N & Piette, Michael J, 1994. "Favoritism versus Search for Good Papers: Empirical Evidence Regarding the Behavior of Journal Editors," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(1), pages 194-203, February.
    3. Yohe, Gary W, 1980. "Current Publication Lags in Economics Journals," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 1050-1055, September.
    4. Philip R. P. Coelho & James E. McClure, 2006. "Why Has Critical Commentary Been Curtailed at Top Economics Journals? A Reply to Robert Whaples," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 3(2), pages 283-291, May.
    5. Scott Smart & Joel Waldfogel, 1996. "A Citation-Based Test for Discrimination at Economics and Finance Journals," NBER Working Papers 5460, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Tsui1, Anne S. & Galaskiewicz, Joseph, 2011. "Commitment to Excellence: Upholding Research Integrity at Management and Organization Review," Management and Organization Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(03), pages 389-395, November.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A10 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - General
    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • B40 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - General

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