IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Related Securities, Allocation of Attention and Price Discovery: Evidence from NYSE-Listed Non-U.S. Stocks

  • Piotr Korczak
  • Kate Phylaktis


In this paper we explore how the composition of a market maker's portfolio and allocation of attention across securities in the portfolio affect pricing. We analyze whether more attention devoted to similar securities enables a market maker to extract information relevant to a stock from order flow to related securities and consequently whether it leads to improved price discovery of the stock. We base on the recent literature on allocation of attention in share trading (Corwin and Coughenour, 2008; Boulatov et al., 2009) and define the prominence of a security as the proportion of its dollar volume in the total volume of the specialist portfolio it belongs to. Our empirical tests are focused on New York Stock Exchange specialists and the U.S. share in price discovery of 64 British and French companies cross-listed on the NYSE. We define related securities as stocks from the same country, the same region or other foreign stocks. We find strong evidence that an increase in the prominence of related stocks in the specialist portfolio leads to a higher U.S. share in price discovery of our sample stocks. We interpret our findings as evidence that concentrating market makers in similar stocks reduces information asymmetries and improves the information environment. To support our argument, we show that an increase in the prominence of other foreign stocks in the specialist portfolio significantly reduces the adverse selection component of the bid-ask spread.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK in its series Bristol Economics Discussion Papers with number 09/612.

in new window

Length: 51 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bri:uobdis:09/612
Contact details of provider: Postal: 8 Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TN
Phone: 0117 928 8415
Fax: 0117 928 8577
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Gonzalo, J. & Granger, C., 1992. "Estimation of Common Long-Memory Components in Cointegrated Systems," Papers 4, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  2. Gagnon, Louis & Karolyi, G. Andrew, 2004. "Multi-market Trading and Arbitrage," Working Paper Series 2004-9, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
  3. Halling, Michael & Pagano, Marco & Randl, Otto & Zechner, Josef, 2005. "Where is the Market? Evidence from Cross-Listings," CEPR Discussion Papers 4987, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Pascual, Roberto & Pascual-Fuster, Bartolome & Climent, Francisco, 2006. "Cross-listing, price discovery and the informativeness of the trading process," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 144-161, May.
  5. Grammig, Joachim & Melvin, Michael & Schlag, Christian, 2005. "Internationally cross-listed stock prices during overlapping trading hours: price discovery and exchange rate effects," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 139-164, January.
  6. Ian Domowitz & Jack Glen & Ananth Madhavan, 1998. "International Cross-Listing and Order Flow Migration: Evidence from an Emerging Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 53(6), pages 2001-2027, December.
  7. Lieberman, Offer & Ben-Zion, Uri & Hauser, Shmuel, 1999. "A characterization of the price behavior of international dual stocks: an error correction approach," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 289-304, February.
  8. Robert Battalio & Andrew Ellul & Robert Jennings, 2007. "Reputation Effects in Trading on the New York Stock Exchange," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(3), pages 1243-1271, 06.
  9. Johansen, Soren, 1991. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Cointegration Vectors in Gaussian Vector Autoregressive Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(6), pages 1551-80, November.
  10. Menkveld, Albert J. & Koopman, Siem Jan & Lucas, Andre, 2007. "Modeling Around-the-Clock Price Discovery for Cross-Listed Stocks Using State Space Methods," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 25, pages 213-225, April.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bri:uobdis:09/612. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jonathan Temple)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.