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Plan Colombia’s Onset: Effects on Homicides and Violent Deaths

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  • Gerson Javier Pérez V.

Abstract

In this paper I explore the potential link between Plan Colombia and violence with a new perspective. I focus the analysis only on the first three running years of the program (2000-2002) in order to avoid the overlapping effect with a security policy started in 2002/2003. This paper exploits the differential in the success of the program among the different regions to identify the potential side effects on homicides and violent deaths. Results show that, although consistently negative estimates, no-significant effects are observed on homicides. On the other hand, I found evidence of increases in the number of violent deaths for women living in urban areas, and an opposite negative effect for men living in rural areas. These findings are fully consistent across different specifications of the model, the cut-off end of the program, and the classification of the regions’ criteria.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerson Javier Pérez V., 2012. "Plan Colombia’s Onset: Effects on Homicides and Violent Deaths," Borradores de Economia 746, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdr:borrec:746
    DOI: 10.32468/be.746
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    1. Mirko Draca & Stephen Machin & Robert Witt, 2011. "Panic on the Streets of London: Police, Crime, and the July 2005 Terror Attacks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 2157-2181, August.
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    6. Daniel Mejía & Pascual Restrepo, 2008. "The War on Illegal Drug Production and Trafficking: An Economic Evaluation of Plan Colombia," Documentos CEDE 005123, Universidad de los Andes - CEDE.
    7. Rafael Di Tella & Ernesto Schargrodsky, 2004. "Do Police Reduce Crime? Estimates Using the Allocation of Police Forces After a Terrorist Attack," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 115-133, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Homicides; regional analysis; Plan Colombia.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • K1 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law

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