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Política fiscal y desigualdad: factores que deberían tenerse en cuenta al momento de diseñar la política pública

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  • Oscar Iván Ávila Montealegre

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Abstract

En este documento se plantea un modelo teórico de generaciones traslapadas en el que se muestra la importancia de la política fiscal para reducir las brechas salariales e incrementar la producción de largo plazo. Los resultados del modelo evidencian que en algunos casos se presenta la disyuntiva entre maximizar la producción de largo plazo y reducir la desigualdad; asimismo, muestran que los efectos de la política fiscal, en términos de desigualdad y producción, dependen de las fuentes de heterogeneidad de los individuos, por lo que al momento de diseñar las estructuras impositivas y distributivas deberían tenerse en cuenta no sólo las dotaciones iniciales de los individuos sino también sus preferencias y sus funciones de acumulación de capital humano.

Suggested Citation

  • Oscar Iván Ávila Montealegre, 2012. "Política fiscal y desigualdad: factores que deberían tenerse en cuenta al momento de diseñar la política pública," Borradores de Economia 732, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdr:borrec:732
    DOI: 10.32468/be.732
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    desigualdad; política fiscal; educación pública; educación y desigualdad;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • H2 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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