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La educación primaria y secundaria en Colombia en el siglo XX

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  • María Teresa Ramírez G.
  • Juana Patricia Téllez C.

Abstract

Este artículo analiza la evolución de la educación primaria y secundaria en Colombia durante el siglo XX desde una perspectiva de largo plazo. Se estudian las principales políticas educativas así como los cambios institucionales y organizacionales que ocurrieron. Se analiza la financiación de la educación, el comportamiento de las principales variables educativas y se examina la evolución de calidad de la educación en el país. Se encontró que la expansión de la educación, tanto primaria como secundaria a lo largo de la primera mitad el siglo XX fue muy lenta. Las transformaciones educativas sólo empezaron a ocurrir en la década de los cincuenta, cuando se presentó un rápido y sostenido crecimiento económico y un cambio signif icativo en la estructura económica y demográfica del país. Desde 1950 y hasta mediados de los setenta, los indicadores educativos crecieron a un ritmo nunca antes visto. Sin embargo, la expansión de los indicadores educativos se freno desde mediados de los setenta y hasta principios de los ochenta, cuando se dio una nueva expansión en los mismos que se mantuvo hasta finales de siglo. A pesar de estos grandes avances durante la segunda mitad del siglo XX, al finalizar los noventa el sector educativo Colombiano seguía presentando bajos niveles de cobertura, eficiencia y calidad así como vaguedad en las competencias y obligaciones en términos administrativos y financieros de los diferentes niveles gubernamentales.

Suggested Citation

  • María Teresa Ramírez G. & Juana Patricia Téllez C., 2006. "La educación primaria y secundaria en Colombia en el siglo XX," Borradores de Economia 379, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdr:borrec:379
    DOI: 10.32468/be.379
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joshua Angrist & Eric Bettinger & Erik Bloom & Elizabeth King & Michael Kremer, 2002. "Vouchers for Private Schooling in Colombia: Evidence from a Randomized Natural Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1535-1558, December.
    2. M. Grubb, 2003. "Editorial," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 189-190, September.
    3. No authors listed, 1985. "Zehn Jahre," Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft - WuG, Kammer für Arbeiter und Angestellte für Wien, Abteilung Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Statistik, vol. 11(1), pages 1-3.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mejía, Leonardo Bonilla, 2010. "Demografía, juventud y homicidios en Colombia, 1979-2006," Revista Lecturas de Economía, Universidad de Antioquia - CIE, August.
    2. Daniel Mejía & María Teresa Ramírez & Jorge Tamayo, 2008. "The Demographic Transition in Colombia: Theory and Evidence," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 005128, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Educación; Colombia; Políticas Educativas;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A20 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • N36 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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