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Local Government Size and Efficiency in Labour Intensive Public Services: Evidence from Local Educational Authorities in England

  • Rhys Andrews

    (Cardiff Business School)

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    No abstract is available for this item.

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    Paper provided by International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University in its series International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU with number paper1214.

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    Length: 25 pages
    Date of creation: 17 Feb 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ays:ispwps:paper1214
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    1. Oliver E. Williamson, 1967. "Hierarchical Control and Optimum Firm Size," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 75, pages 123.
    2. James M. Poterba, 1996. "Demographic Structure and the Political Economy of Public Education," NBER Working Papers 5677, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Duncombe, William & Miner, Jerry & Ruggiero, John, 1995. "Potential cost savings from school district consolidation: A case study of New York," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 265-284, September.
    4. Hausman, Jerry A, 1978. "Specification Tests in Econometrics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1251-71, November.
    5. S.J. Bailey, 1991. "Fiscal Stress: The New System of Local Government Finance in England," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 28(6), pages 889-907, December.
    6. George A. Boyne, 1996. "Scale, Performance And The New Public Management: An Empirical Analysis Of Local Authority Services," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(6), pages 809-826, November.
    7. J. A. Hausman & W. E. Taylor, 1980. "Panel Data and Unobservable Individual Effects," Working papers 255, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    8. Downes, Thomas A. & Pogue, Thomas F., 1994. "Adjusting School Aid Formulas for the Higher Cost of Educating Disadvantaged Students," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 47(1), pages 89-110, March.
    9. David N King & Yue Ma, 2000. "Local Authority Size in Theory and Practice," Environment and Planning C, SAGE Publishing, vol. 18(3), pages 255-270, June.
    10. Colegrave, Andrew D. & Giles, Margaret J., 2008. "School cost functions: A meta-regression analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 688-696, December.
    11. Trevor Breusch & Michael B. Ward & Hoa Thi Minh Nguyen & Tom Kompas, 2011. "FEVD: Just IV or Just Mistaken?," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-17, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    12. Richard J. Butler & David H. Monk, 1985. "The Cost of Public Schooling in New York State: The Role of Scale and Efficiency in 1978-79," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 20(3), pages 361-382.
    13. Salmon, Pierre, 1987. "Decentralisation as an Incentive Scheme," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(2), pages 24-43, Summer.
    14. Wales, Terence J, 1973. "The Effect of School and District Size on Education Costs in British Columbia," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 710-20, October.
    15. K. Chakraborty & B. Biswas & WC. Lewis, 2000. "Economies of scale in public education: an econometric analysis," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(2), pages 238-247, 04.
    16. Michelle Trawick & Roy Howsen, 2006. "Crime and community heterogeneity: race, ethnicity, and religion," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(6), pages 341-345.
    17. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
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