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The arbitrage-free Multivariate Mixture Dynamics Model: Consistent single-assets and index volatility smiles

  • Damiano Brigo
  • Francesco Rapisarda
  • Abir Sridi

We introduce a multivariate diffusion model that is able to price derivative securities featuring multiple underlying assets. Each asset volatility smile is modeled according to a density-mixture dynamical model while the same property holds for the multivariate process of all assets, whose density is a mixture of multivariate basic densities. This allows to reconcile single name and index/basket volatility smiles in a consistent framework. Our approach could be dubbed a multidimensional local volatility approach with vector-state dependent diffusion matrix. The model is quite tractable, leading to a complete market and not requiring Fourier techniques for calibration and dependence measures, contrary to multivariate stochastic volatility models such as Wishart. We prove existence and uniqueness of solutions for the model stochastic differential equations, provide formulas for a number of basket options, and analyze the dependence structure of the model in detail by deriving a number of results on covariances, its copula function and rank correlation measures and volatilities-assets correlations. A comparison with sampling simply-correlated suitably discretized one-dimensional mixture dynamical paths is made, both in terms of option pricing and of dependence, and first order expansion relationships between the two models' local covariances are derived. We also show existence of a multivariate uncertain volatility model of which our multivariate local volatilities model is a Markovian projection, highlighting that the projected model is smoother and avoids a number of drawbacks of the uncertain volatility version. We also show a consistency result where the Markovian projection of a geometric basket in the multivariate model is a univariate mixture dynamics model. A few numerical examples on basket and spread options pricing conclude the paper.

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File URL: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1302.7010
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Paper provided by arXiv.org in its series Papers with number 1302.7010.

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Date of creation: Feb 2013
Date of revision: Sep 2014
Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1302.7010
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  1. Black, Fischer & Scholes, Myron S, 1973. "The Pricing of Options and Corporate Liabilities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(3), pages 637-54, May-June.
  2. Jackwerth, Jens Carsten & Rubinstein, Mark, 1996. " Recovering Probability Distributions from Option Prices," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(5), pages 1611-32, December.
  3. Olivier Renault & Jean-Luc Prigent & Olivier Scaillet, 2000. "An Autoregressive Conditional Binomial Option Pricing Model," FMG Discussion Papers dp364, Financial Markets Group.
  4. Martin Forde & Antoine Jacquier, 2011. "The large-maturity smile for the Heston model," Finance and Stochastics, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 755-780, December.
  5. Breeden, Douglas T & Litzenberger, Robert H, 1978. "Prices of State-contingent Claims Implicit in Option Prices," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(4), pages 621-51, October.
  6. Heston, Steven L, 1993. "A Closed-Form Solution for Options with Stochastic Volatility with Applications to Bond and Currency Options," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(2), pages 327-43.
  7. Margrabe, William, 1978. "The Value of an Option to Exchange One Asset for Another," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 33(1), pages 177-86, March.
  8. Damiano Brigo & Fabio Mercurio & Giulio Sartorelli, 2003. "Alternative asset-price dynamics and volatility smile," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 173-183.
  9. Cox, John C. & Ross, Stephen A., 1976. "The valuation of options for alternative stochastic processes," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1-2), pages 145-166.
  10. José Fonseca & Martino Grasselli & Claudio Tebaldi, 2007. "Option pricing when correlations are stochastic: an analytical framework," Review of Derivatives Research, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 151-180, May.
  11. Mark Britten-Jones & Anthony Neuberger, 2000. "Option Prices, Implied Price Processes, and Stochastic Volatility," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(2), pages 839-866, 04.
  12. Hull, John C & White, Alan D, 1987. " The Pricing of Options on Assets with Stochastic Volatilities," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(2), pages 281-300, June.
  13. Damiano Brigo, 2008. "The general mixture-diffusion SDE and its relationship with an uncertain-volatility option model with volatility-asset decorrelation," Papers 0812.4052, arXiv.org.
  14. Fengler, Matthias R. & Härdle, Wolfgang & Mammen, Enno, 2003. "Implied volatility string dynamics," SFB 373 Discussion Papers 2003,54, Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes.
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