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Dynamical Hurst exponent as a tool to monitor unstable periods in financial time series

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  • Raffaello Morales
  • T. Di Matteo
  • Ruggero Gramatica
  • Tomaso Aste

Abstract

We investigate the use of the Hurst exponent, dynamically computed over a moving time-window, to evaluate the level of stability/instability of financial firms. Financial firms bailed-out as a consequence of the 2007-2010 credit crisis show a neat increase with time of the generalized Hurst exponent in the period preceding the unfolding of the crisis. Conversely, firms belonging to other market sectors, which suffered the least throughout the crisis, show opposite behaviors. These findings suggest the possibility of using the scaling behavior as a tool to track the level of stability of a firm. In this paper, we introduce a method to compute the generalized Hurst exponent which assigns larger weights to more recent events with respect to older ones. In this way large fluctuations in the remote past are less likely to influence the recent past. We also investigate the scaling associated with the tails of the log-returns distributions and compare this scaling with the scaling associated with the Hurst exponent, observing that the processes underlying the price dynamics of these firms are truly multi-scaling.

Suggested Citation

  • Raffaello Morales & T. Di Matteo & Ruggero Gramatica & Tomaso Aste, 2011. "Dynamical Hurst exponent as a tool to monitor unstable periods in financial time series," Papers 1109.0465, arXiv.org.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1109.0465
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Matteo, T. Di & Aste, T. & Dacorogna, Michel M., 2005. "Long-term memories of developed and emerging markets: Using the scaling analysis to characterize their stage of development," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 827-851, April.
    2. Benoit Mandelbrot & Adlai Fisher & Laurent Calvet, 1997. "A Multifractal Model of Asset Returns," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1164, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    3. Liu, Ruipeng & Di Matteo, T. & Lux, Thomas, 2007. "True and apparent scaling: The proximity of the Markov-switching multifractal model to long-range dependence," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 383(1), pages 35-42.
    4. Liu, Ruipeng & Di Matteo, Tiziana & Lux, Thomas, 2008. "Multifractality and long-range dependence of asset returns: The scaling behaviour of the Markov-switching multifractal model with lognormal volatility components," Kiel Working Papers 1427, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Scalas, Enrico, 1998. "Scaling in the market of futures," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 253(1), pages 394-402.
    6. Laurent Calvet & Adlai Fisher, 2002. "Multifractality In Asset Returns: Theory And Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(3), pages 381-406, August.
    7. Kaizoji, Taisei, 2003. "Scaling behavior in land markets," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 326(1), pages 256-264.
    8. Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Marc Potters & Martin Meyer, 1999. "Apparent multifractality in financial time series," Science & Finance (CFM) working paper archive 9906347, Science & Finance, Capital Fund Management.
    9. Barunik, Jozef & Kristoufek, Ladislav, 2010. "On Hurst exponent estimation under heavy-tailed distributions," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 389(18), pages 3844-3855.
    10. Patrick A. Groenendijk & André Lucas & Casper G. de Vries, 1998. "A Hybrid Joint Moment Ratio Test for Financial Time Series," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 98-104/2, Tinbergen Institute.
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