IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ajk/ajkdps/108.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Bank Liquidity Channel of Financial (In)stability

Author

Listed:
  • Joshua Bosshardt

    (Federal Housing Finance Agency)

  • Ali Kakhbod

    (Rice University)

  • Farzad Saidi

    (UniversityofBonn & CEPR)

Abstract

We examine the system-wide effects of liquidity regulation on banks’ balance sheets. In the general equilibrium model, banks have to hold liquid assets, and choose among illiquid assets varying in the extent to which they are difficult to value before maturity, e.g., structured securities. By improving the liquidity of interbank markets, tighter liquidity requirements induce banks to invest in such complex assets. We evaluate the welfare properties of combining liquidity regulation with other financial-stability policies, and show that it can complement ex-ante policies, such as asset-specific taxes, whereas it can undermine the benefits of ex-post interventions, such as quantative easing.

Suggested Citation

  • Joshua Bosshardt & Ali Kakhbod & Farzad Saidi, 2021. "The Bank Liquidity Channel of Financial (In)stability," ECONtribute Discussion Papers Series 108, University of Bonn and University of Cologne, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:ajk:ajkdps:108
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econtribute.de/RePEc/ajk/ajkdps/ECONtribute_108_2021.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2021
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gara Afonso & Marco Cipriani & Adam Copeland & Anna Kovner & Gabriele La Spada & Antoine Martin, 2021. "The Market Events of Mid-September 2019," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 27(2), pages 1-26, August.
    2. Evan Gatev & Philip E. Strahan, 2006. "Banks' Advantage in Hedging Liquidity Risk: Theory and Evidence from the Commercial Paper Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(2), pages 867-892, April.
    3. Flora Lutz & Paul Pichler, 2021. "Financial Stability Regulation under Borrowing and Liquidity Externalities," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 19(2), pages 1000-1040.
    4. Enrico Perotti & Javier Suarez, 2011. "A Pigovian Approach to Liquidity Regulation," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 7(4), pages 3-41, December.
    5. Matthew Baron & Emil Verner & Wei Xiong, 2021. "Banking Crises Without Panics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 136(1), pages 51-113.
    6. Krugman, Paul, 1979. "A Model of Balance-of-Payments Crises," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 11(3), pages 311-325, August.
    7. Jacklin, Charles J & Bhattacharya, Sudipto, 1988. "Distinguishing Panics and Information-Based Bank Runs: Welfare and Policy Implications," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(3), pages 568-592, June.
    8. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi, 2009. "The Consequences of Mortgage Credit Expansion: Evidence from the U.S. Mortgage Default Crisis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1449-1496.
    9. Anil K. Kashyap & Raghuram Rajan & Jeremy C. Stein, 2002. "Banks as Liquidity Providers: An Explanation for the Coexistence of Lending and Deposit‐taking," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(1), pages 33-73, February.
    10. Franklin Allen & Douglas Gale, 2017. "How Should Bank Liquidity be Regulated?," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Douglas D Evanoff & George G Kaufman & Agnese Leonello & Simone Manganelli (ed.), Achieving Financial Stability Challenges to Prudential Regulation, chapter 11, pages 135-157, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    11. Jeremy C. Stein & Anil K. Kashyap, 2000. "What Do a Million Observations on Banks Say about the Transmission of Monetary Policy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 407-428, June.
    12. Brendan Daley & Brett Green, 2016. "An Information-Based Theory of Time-Varying Liquidity," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 71(2), pages 809-870, April.
    13. Markus K. Brunnermeier, 2009. "Deciphering the Liquidity and Credit Crunch 2007-2008," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 77-100, Winter.
    14. Daniel Roberts & Asani Sarkar & Or Shachar, 2018. "The Costs and Benefits of Liquidity Regulations," Staff Reports 852, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    15. Caprio, Gerard (ed.), 2012. "The Evidence and Impact of Financial Globalization," Elsevier Monographs, Elsevier, edition 1, number 9780123978745.
    16. Matthew Baron & Emil Verner & Wei Xiong, 0. "Banking Crises Without Panics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 136(1), pages 51-113.
    17. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Guimaraes, Bernardo & Roubini, Nouriel, 2006. "International lending of last resort and moral hazard: A model of IMF's catalytic finance," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 441-471, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Xavier Vives, 2014. "Strategic Complementarity, Fragility, and Regulation," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(12), pages 3547-3592.
    2. Goldstein, Itay & Razin, Assaf, 2015. "Three Branches of Theories of Financial Crises," Foundations and Trends(R) in Finance, now publishers, vol. 10(2), pages 113-180, 30.
    3. Toni Ahnert & Ali Kakhbod, 2017. "Information Choice and Amplification of Financial Crises," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 30(6), pages 2130-2178.
    4. Kristian Blickle & Markus K. Brunnermeier & Stephan Luck, 2022. "Who Can Tell Which Banks Will Fail?," NBER Working Papers 29753, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. André F. Silva, 2019. "Strategic Liquidity Mismatch and Financial Sector Stability," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2019-082, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    6. Ippolito, Filippo & Peydró, José-Luis & Polo, Andrea & Sette, Enrico, 2016. "Double bank runs and liquidity risk management," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(1), pages 135-154.
    7. Carletti, Elena & De Marco, Filippo & Ioannidou, Vasso & Sette, Enrico, 2021. "Banks as patient lenders: Evidence from a tax reform," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 141(1), pages 6-26.
    8. Adonis Antoniades, 2015. "Commercial bank failures during The Great Recession: the real (estate) story," BIS Working Papers 530, Bank for International Settlements.
    9. Felipe Restrepo & Lina Cardona‐Sosa & Philip E. Strahan, 2019. "Funding Liquidity without Banks: Evidence from a Shock to the Cost of Very Short‐Term Debt," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 74(6), pages 2875-2914, December.
    10. Dong Beom Choi & Hyun-Soo Choi, 2021. "The Effect of Monetary Policy on Bank Wholesale Funding," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 67(1), pages 388-416, January.
    11. Ebrahimi Kahou, Mahdi & Lehar, Alfred, 2017. "Macroprudential policy: A review," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 92-105.
    12. Christopher Martin & Manju Puri & Alexander Ufier, 2018. "Deposit Inflows and Outflows in Failing Banks: The Role of Deposit Insurance," NBER Working Papers 24589, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Correa, Ricardo & Sapriza, Horacio & Zlate, Andrei, 2021. "Wholesale funding runs, global banks' supply of liquidity insurance, and corporate investment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C).
    14. Viral V. Acharya & Heitor Almeida & Filippo Ippolito & Ander Perez‐Orive, 2021. "Credit Lines and the Liquidity Insurance Channel," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 53(5), pages 901-938, August.
    15. Loutskina, Elena, 2011. "The role of securitization in bank liquidity and funding management," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(3), pages 663-684, June.
    16. Lorenzo Ricci & Giovanni Soggia & Lorenzo Trimarchi, 2022. "The Impact of Bank Lending Standards on Credit to Firms," Working Papers ECARES 2022-01, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    17. Acharya, Viral V & Mora, Nada, 2011. "Are Banks Passive Liquidity Backstops? Deposit Rates and Flows during the 2007-2009 Crisis," CEPR Discussion Papers 8706, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    18. Angela Maddaloni & Jose-Luis Peydro, 2011. "Bank Risk-taking, Securitization, Supervision, and Low Interest Rates: Evidence from the Euro-area and the U.S. Lending Standards," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(6), pages 2121-2165.
    19. Pagratis, Spyros & Topaloglou, Nikolas & Tsionas, Mike, 2017. "System stress testing of bank liquidity risk," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 73(PA), pages 22-40.
    20. I‐Ju Chen & Yu‐Yi Lee & Yong‐Chin Liu, 2020. "Bank liquidity, macroeconomic risk, and bank risk: Evidence from the Financial Services Modernization Act," European Financial Management, European Financial Management Association, vol. 26(1), pages 143-175, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    liquidity regulation; securitization; interbank markets; financial stability; quantitative easing;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ajk:ajkdps:108. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://www.econtribute.de .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ECONtribute Office (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://www.econtribute.de .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.