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GINI DP 12: Factor Components of Inequality. A Cross-Country Study

  • Cecilia Garcia Peñalosa

    ()

    (Centre de la Vieille Charité, GREQAM)

  • Orgiazzi, E.

This paper uses data from the Luxembourg Income Study to examine some of the forces that have driven changes in household income inequality over the last three decades of the 20th century. We decompose inequality for 6 countries (Canada, Germany, Norway, Sweden, the UK, and the US) into the three sources of market income: earnings, property income and income from self-employment. Our findings indicate that although changes in the distribution of earnings are an important aspect of recent increases in inequality, they are not the only one. In some countries the contribution of self-employment income to inequality has been on the rise. In others, increases in inequality in capital income –probably caused by tax changes- account for a substantial fraction of the observed changes in the distribution of income. JEL classification numbers: D31, D33

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Paper provided by AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies in its series GINI Discussion Papers with number 12.

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Date of creation: Jul 2011
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Handle: RePEc:aia:ginidp:12
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