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Promise and Pitfalls in the Use of 'Secondary' Data -Sets: Income Inequality in OECD Countries

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  • Atkinson, A.B.
  • Brandolini, A.

Abstract

Secondary data-set have come to play an increasing role in empirical economic research. This paper examines the major new secondary data-set assembled by Klaus Deininger and Lyn Squire and the World Bank. We concentrate on its coverage of the OECD countries. We have particularly in mind the user of income inequality statistics who does not wish to go back to the original data.

Suggested Citation

  • Atkinson, A.B. & Brandolini, A., 2000. "Promise and Pitfalls in the Use of 'Secondary' Data -Sets: Income Inequality in OECD Countries," Papers 379, Banca Italia - Servizio di Studi.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:banita:379
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    DISTRIBUTION ; INCOME ; INFORMATION;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General

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