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Aggregation Issues In Pest Control Economics: A Bioeconomic Approach

  • Young, Douglas L.
  • Smith, Elwin G.
  • Kwon, Tae-Jin
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    Previous research has defined “aggregate pesticide expenditures” as the control variable; however, virtually all managerial recommendations and environmental restrictions target specific pesticides, rates, and crops. A bioeconomic approach considering particular pesticides on specific pests and crops is recommended for managerial-policy applications and testing for increasing returns. Exponential weed control and seven popular yield damage functional forms were estimated for a bioeconomic weed control model for winter wheat in Washington. Concavity with respect to herbicide rate was observed for most popular damage functions at normal weed densities and manufacturers’ label rates, but convexity existed outside these ranges and should be checked.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/36448
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    Paper provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its series 2000 Annual Meeting, June 29-July 1, 2000, Vancouver, British Columbia with number 36448.

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    Date of creation: 2000
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:waeava:36448
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://waeaonline.org/

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    1. Swinton, Scott M. & King, Robert P., 1994. "A bioeconomic model for weed management in corn and soybean," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 313-335.
    2. Pannell, David J., 1990. "An Economic Response Model Of Herbicide Application For Weed Control," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 34(03), December.
    3. Alain Carpentier & Robert D. Weaver, 1997. "Damage Control Productivity: Why Econometrics Matters," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(1), pages 47-61.
    4. Alfons Weersink & William Deen & Susan Weaver, 1991. "Defining and Measuring Economic Threshold Levels," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 39(4), pages 619-625, December.
    5. David A. Hennessy, 1997. "Damage Control and Increasing Returns: Further Results," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(3), pages 786-791.
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