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Anticipating and Responding to Drought Emergencies in Southern Africa: Lessons from the 2002-2003 Experience

Author

Listed:
  • Tschirley, David L.
  • Nijhoff, Jan J.
  • Arlindo, Pedro
  • Mwiinga, Billy
  • Weber, Michael T.
  • Jayne, Thomas S.

Abstract

This paper examines the efficiency and effectiveness of emergency response in southern Africa through the lens of the 2002/03 food crisis in the region. The authors outline improvements in information and operational procedures needed to enhance the response to future events. They also discuss national and regional trade regime changes that would reduce the need for emergency response, and consider what lessons the 2002/03 crisis may have for the role of Strategic Grain Reserves (SGRs).

Suggested Citation

  • Tschirley, David L. & Nijhoff, Jan J. & Arlindo, Pedro & Mwiinga, Billy & Weber, Michael T. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2006. "Anticipating and Responding to Drought Emergencies in Southern Africa: Lessons from the 2002-2003 Experience," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54564, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:54564
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/54564
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mabota, Anabela & Arlindo, Pedro & Paulo, Antonio M. & Donovan, Cynthia, 2003. "Market Information: A Low Cost Tool for Agricultural Market Development?," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 55235, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Zulu, Ballard & Nijhoff, Jan J. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Negassa, Asfaw, 2000. "Is the Glass Half-Empty or Half Full? An Analysis of Agricultural Production Trends in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54458, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Tschirley, David & Donovan, Cynthia & Weber, Michael T., 1996. "Food aid and food markets: lessons from Mozambique," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 189-209, May.
    4. Nijhoff, Jan J. & Tschirley, David L. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Tembo, Gelson & Arlindo, Pedro & Mwiinga, Billy & Shaffer, James D. & Weber, Michael T. & Donovan, Cynthia & Boughton, Duncan, 2003. "Coordination for Long-Term Food Security by Government, Private Sector and Donors: Issues and Challenges," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 11319, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Nijhoff, Jan J. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Mwiinga, Billy & Shaffer, James D., 2002. "Markets Need Predictable Government Actions to Function Effectively: The Case of Importing Maize in Times of Deficit," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54609, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tschirley, David L. & Staatz, John M. & Donovan, Cynthia, 2007. "Linking Emergency Response to Need in “Food Emergencies”," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54561, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Jayne, T.S. & Zulu, Ballard & Nijhoff, J.J., 2006. "Stabilizing food markets in eastern and southern Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 328-341, August.
    3. Govereh, Jones & Haggblade, Steven & Nielson, Hunter & Tschirley, David L., 2008. "Maize Market Sheds in Eastern and Southern Africa. Report 1," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55374, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Steven Haggblade, 2013. "Unscrambling Africa: Regional Requirements for Achieving Food Security," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 31(2), pages 149-176, March.
    5. Tschirley, David L. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2008. "Food Crises and Food Markets: Implications for Emergency Response in Southern Africa," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54559, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Nijhoff, Jan J., 2009. "Staple Food Trade in the COMESA Region: The Need for a Regional Approach to Stimulate Agricultural Growth and Enhance Food Security," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 62227, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Klaus Abbink & Thomas Jayne & Lars Moller, 2011. "The Relevance of a Rules-based Maize Marketing Policy: An Experimental Case Study of Zambia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 207-230.
    8. World Bank, 2007. "Zambia : Poverty and Vulnerabiltiy Assessment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7863, The World Bank.
    9. Tschirley, David L. & Kabwe, Stephen, 2007. "Cotton in Zambia: 2007 Assessment of its Organization, Performance, Current Policy Initiatives, and Challenges for the Future," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54485, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    10. Giovanni Andrea Cornia & Laura Deotti & Maria Sassi, 2012. "Food Price Volatility over the Last Decade in Niger and Malawi: Extent, Sources and Impact on Child Malnutrition," Working Papers - Economics wp2012_04.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    11. del Ninno, Carlo & Dorosh, Paul A. & Subbarao, Kalanidhi, 2007. "Food aid, domestic policy and food security: Contrasting experiences from South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 413-435, August.
    12. Donovan, Cynthia & McGlinchy, Megan & Staatz, John M. & Tschirley, David L., 2006. "Emergency Needs Assessments and the Impact of Food Aid on Local Markets," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54566, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    food security; drought; emergency; Southern Africa; Food Security and Poverty; Q18;

    JEL classification:

    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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