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Rural-Urban Migrants in Vietnam: Should we Stay in the Cities or Return Home?

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  • Nguyen, Duc Loc
  • Grote, Ulrike

Abstract

This paper investigates the factors determining the length of migration and return plans of rural migrants within Vietnam. The findings shows that migrants coming from rural households that faced a higher number of idiosyncratic shocks increase their stays in the cities, while those from original households that experienced transient shocks shorten the length of their stays in the cities. An increased length of migration is also observed among migrants and households with higher human capital. A decreased income gap between destination and original provinces due to the higher economic growth of original places also increases the duration of migration. The results of the analysis on the migration intensity imply that the plans of migrants to return not only increase in case they face shocks in the cities, but also with the improvement of the living conditions at their original places.

Suggested Citation

  • Nguyen, Duc Loc & Grote, Ulrike, 2015. "Rural-Urban Migrants in Vietnam: Should we Stay in the Cities or Return Home?," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 229380, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:229380
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.229380
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/229380/files/Nguyen_%20ICAE%202015-Rural-Urban.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ariane TICHIT & Daniela BORODAK, 2009. "Should we stay or should we go? Irregular migration and duration of stay: the case of Moldovan migrants," Working Papers 200915, CERDI.
    2. Djajic, Slobodan & Milbourne, Ross, 1988. "A general equilibrium model of guest-worker migration : The source-country perspective," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3-4), pages 335-351, November.
    3. Sylvie Démurger & Hui Xu, 2011. "Left-Behind Children and Return Decisions of Rural Migrants in China," Post-Print halshs-00625636, HAL.
    4. Stark, Oded & Bloom, David E, 1985. "The New Economics of Labor Migration," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 173-178, May.
    5. Stefan Dercon, 2002. "Income Risk, Coping Strategies, and Safety Nets," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 141-166, September.
    6. Dustmann, Christian, 2000. "Temporary Migration and Economic Assimilation," IZA Discussion Papers 186, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Christian Dustmann, 2003. "Children and return migration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(4), pages 815-830, November.
    8. Anders Boman, 2011. "Does migration pay? Earnings effects of geographic mobility following job displacement," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1369-1384, October.
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    Keywords

    Community/Rural/Urban Development; Labor and Human Capital;

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