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Does Distance Make Good Neighbors? The Role Of Spatial Externalities And Income In Residential Development Patterns

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  • Moreno-Sanchez, Rocio del Pilar
  • Irwin, Elena G.

Abstract

Scattered residential development is explained using a theoretical model of residential location in which household interactions generate externalities that determine location choices. Results demonstrate the role of income and heterogeneous preferences in generating this form of sprawl. Among our findings is that rising income generates only temporary increases in sprawl.

Suggested Citation

  • Moreno-Sanchez, Rocio del Pilar & Irwin, Elena G., 2004. "Does Distance Make Good Neighbors? The Role Of Spatial Externalities And Income In Residential Development Patterns," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19973, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea04:19973
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Research Methods/ Statistical Methods;

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