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The Prevalence of Under-Nourished Child Obese Mother Phenomenon in Rural Areas: Evidence from Central Province of Kenya

Author

Listed:
  • Mburu, John G.
  • Okello, Julius Juma

Abstract

Attainment of nutritional security is a major focus of the Millennium Development Goals. Despite efforts, Sub-Saharan Africa countries are yet to make significant progress in becoming nutritionally secure. Over the years, maternal obesity and child under-nutrition have concurrently been on the increase. The rise in obesity and child under-nutrition is attributed to, among others, urbanization-driven shifts in eating habits and lifestyle, changes in purchasing power, food assistance and stress-related medical conditions. Studies in Asia and Latin America have associated co-existence of adult obesity and child under-nutrition with urban areas. In this paper we examine the prevalence of child under-nutrition and mother obesity in rural Kenya. We find that 22 per cent of households with undernourished children have mothers that are obese. The paper also find a positive association between wealth, education and woman status and the existence of undernourished child obese mother phenomenon in the same household. The policy implication of this double burden problem is that interventions aimed at solving child malnutrition need to be targeted.

Suggested Citation

  • Mburu, John G. & Okello, Julius Juma, 2008. "The Prevalence of Under-Nourished Child Obese Mother Phenomenon in Rural Areas: Evidence from Central Province of Kenya," 2007 Second International Conference, August 20-22, 2007, Accra, Ghana 52160, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaae07:52160
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