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Working Paper 126 - China’s Trade and FDI in Africa

  • Mary-Françoise Renard
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    China’s growth and its capacity to move in thirty years from under-development and extreme poverty to an emerging global power and one of the largest exporter of manufactured goods has attracted the attention of many developing countries. China has served as a development model for Africa and an alternative source of trade and finance from Africa’s traditional development partners. The impact of China on African economies has been diverse, depending in part on the sectoral composition of each country’s production. Overall, China’s increased engagement with Africa could generate important gains for African economies. This paper analyzes the different impacts of China on Africa, quantifies the advantages and disadvantages, and policy suggestions necessary to maximize the development impact of China. One overriding consideration is that reaping the full benefits from Chinese trade and investment will require substantial improvements in governance in African economies.

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    Paper provided by African Development Bank in its series Working Paper Series with number 297.

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    Date of creation: 23 Jun 2011
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    Handle: RePEc:adb:adbwps:297
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    1. Kaufmann, Daniel & Kraay, Aart, 2008. "Governance Indicators: Where Are We, Where Should We Be Going?," MPRA Paper 8212, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. César Calderón & Alberto Chong & Ernesto H. Stein, 2003. "Trade Intensity and Business Cycle Synchronization: Are Developing Countries any Different?," Research Department Publications 4315, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    3. Peter K. Schott, 2008. "The relative sophistication of Chinese exports," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 23, pages 5-49, 01.
    4. Raphael Kaplinsky & Mike Morris, 2009. "Chinese FDI in Sub-Saharan Africa: Engaging with Large Dragons," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 21(4), pages 551-569, September.
    5. Giorgia Giovannetti & Marco Sanfilippo, 2009. "Do Chinese Exports Crowd-out African Goods? An Econometric Analysis by Country and Sector," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 21(4), pages 506-530, September.
    6. Atsushi Iimi, 2006. "Did Botswana Escape From the Resource Curse?," IMF Working Papers 06/138, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Nelson Villoria, 2009. "China's Growth and the Agricultural Exports of Sub-Saharan Southern Africa," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 21(4), pages 531-550, September.
    8. Jian-Ye Wang, 2007. "What Drives China's Growing Role in Africa?," IMF Working Papers 07/211, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Hany Besada & Yang Wang & John Whalley, 2008. "China's Growing Economic Activity in Africa," NBER Working Papers 14024, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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