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Bridging the Divide: Measuring Party System Change and Classifying Party Systems

Author

Listed:
  • Riccardo Pelizzo

    (Nazarbayev University, Astana, Kazakhstan)

  • Zim Nwokora

    (Deakin University, Australia)

Abstract

Party systems research has proceeded along two parallel lines of inquiry, one predominantly “qualitative†and the other “quantitative.†This article attempts to bridge this divide in two ways. First, by showing that qualitative information can be valuable in the construction of quantitative measures. Second, by showing that the results from applying theoretically- sensitive measurement tools can be useful for qualitative classification. These analyses are performed using an original dataset of party system changes in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Riccardo Pelizzo & Zim Nwokora, 2016. "Bridging the Divide: Measuring Party System Change and Classifying Party Systems," Research Africa Network Working Papers 16/042, Research Africa Network (RAN).
  • Handle: RePEc:abh:wpaper:16/042
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tsebelis, George, 1999. "Veto Players and Law Production in Parliamentary Democracies: An Empirical Analysis," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 93(3), pages 591-608, September.
    2. Taylor, Michael & Herman, V. M., 1971. "Party Systems and Government Stability," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 65(1), pages 28-37, March.
    3. Basedau, Matthias & Stroh, Alexander, 2008. "Measuring Party Institutionalization in Developing Countries: A New Research Instrument Applied to 28 African Political Parties," GIGA Working Papers 69, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
    4. Mozaffar, Shaheen & Scarritt, James R. & Galaich, Glen, 2003. "Electoral Institutions, Ethnopolitical Cleavages, and Party Systems in Africa's Emerging Democracies," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 97(3), pages 379-390, August.
    5. James E. Alt & David Dreyer Lassen, 2006. "Transparency, Political Polarization, and Political Budget Cycles in OECD Countries," American Journal of Political Science, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 50(3), pages 530-550, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Samba Diop & Simplice A. Asongu & Vanessa S. Tchamyou, 2021. "The Macroeconomic Impact of Recent Political Conflicts in Africa: Generalized Synthetic Counterfactual Evidence," Research Africa Network Working Papers 21/060, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    2. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2021. "Governance and renewable energy consumption in sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 21/030, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    3. Asongu, Simplice & Diop, Samba & Addis, Amsalu, 2020. "Governance, Inequality and Inclusive Education in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 107512, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Samba Diop & Simplice A. Asongu & Vanessa S. Tchamyou, 2021. "The Macroeconomic Impact of Recent Political Conflicts in Africa: Generalized Synthetic Counterfactual Evidence," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 21/060, African Governance and Development Institute..
    5. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "Inclusive development in environmental sustainability in sub‐Saharan Africa: Insights from governance mechanisms," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(4), pages 713-724, July.
    6. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "Governance, capital flight and industrialisation in Africa," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 8(1), pages 1-22, December.
    7. Asongu, Simplice & Uduji, Joseph & Okolo-Obasi, Elda, 2020. "Drivers and persistence of death in conflicts: global evidence," MPRA Paper 107240, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Simplice A. Asongu, 2019. "FDI in Selected Developing Countries: Evidence from Bundling and Unbundling Governance," Working Papers 19/057, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    9. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2020. "Finance, Governance and Inclusive Education in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers of The Association for Promoting Women in Research and Development in Africa (ASPROWORDA). 20/007, The Association for Promoting Women in Research and Development in Africa (ASPROWORDA).
    10. Asongu, Simplice A & Odhiambo, Nicholas M, 2019. "Governance,CO2 emissions and inclusive human development in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 25253, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    11. Asongu, Simplice & Uduji, Joseph & Okolo-Obasi, Elda, 2020. "Political instability and political terror: global evidence on persistence," MPRA Paper 103147, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Simplice A. Asongu & Joseph Nnanna, 2019. "Foreign aid, instability and governance in Africa," Research Africa Network Working Papers 19/022, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    13. Simplice A. Asongu & Thales P. Yapatake Kossele & Joseph Nnanna, 2021. "Not all that glitters is gold: political stability and trade in Sub-Saharan Africa," Research Africa Network Working Papers 21/005, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    14. Simplice Asongu & Joseph Nnanna & Paul Acha-Anyi, 2019. "Information technology, governance and insurance in Sub-Saharan Africa," Social Responsibility Journal, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 16(8), pages 1253-1273, September.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Political Parties; Political Institutions; Party System Change;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • K00 - Law and Economics - - General - - - General (including Data Sources and Description)
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism
    • P43 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Finance; Public Finance
    • P50 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - General

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