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Capital Accumulation, Crisis and Return to Nature?

In: Crisis, Innovation and Sustainable Development

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  • Dimitrios Patelis

Abstract

This unique and informative book highlights the relationship between crisis, innovation, and sustainable development, and discusses the necessary conditions required to seize the ecological opportunity. The authors study the strength of change for building a new society, and the theoretical origins and political aspects of environmental concerns. They also sketch the outlines of a global governance system seeking to promote sustainable development.

Suggested Citation

  • Dimitrios Patelis, 2012. "Capital Accumulation, Crisis and Return to Nature?," Chapters, in: Blandine Laperche & Nadine Levratto & Dimitri Uzunidis (ed.), Crisis, Innovation and Sustainable Development, chapter 9, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14579_9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jevons, William Stanley, 1866. "Brief Account of a General Mathematical Theory of Political Economy," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 29, pages 282-287.
    2. Martin L. Weitzman, 2007. "A Review of the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(3), pages 703-724, September.
    3. Blandine Laperche & Nadine Levratto & Dimitri Uzunidis (ed.), 2012. "Crisis, Innovation and Sustainable Development," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14579.
    4. Richard P.F. Holt & Steven Pressman & Clive L. Spash (ed.), 2009. "Post Keynesian and Ecological Economics," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 12988.
    5. Carlota Perez, 2007. "Great Surges of development and alternative forms of globalization," The Other Canon Foundation and Tallinn University of Technology Working Papers in Technology Governance and Economic Dynamics 15, TUT Ragnar Nurkse Department of Innovation and Governance.
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