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Analysing human social networks

In: Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Spatially Integrated Social Science

Author

Listed:
  • Galina Daraganova
  • Philippa Pattison

Abstract

The chapters in this book provide coverage of the theoretical underpinnings and methodologies that typify research using a Spatially Integrated Social Science (SISS) approach. This insightful Handbook is intended chiefly as a primer for students and budding researchers who wish to investigate social, economic and behavioural phenomena by giving explicit consideration to the roles of space and place. The majority of chapters provide an emphasis on demonstrating applications of methods, tools and techniques that are used in SISS research, including long-established and relatively new approaches.

Suggested Citation

  • Galina Daraganova & Philippa Pattison, 2014. "Analysing human social networks," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Spatially Integrated Social Science, chapter 21, pages 459-488 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14407_21
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9780857932969.00030.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tom Snijders, 1991. "Enumeration and simulation methods for 0–1 matrices with given marginals," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 56(3), pages 397-417, September.
    2. Robert Mokken, 1979. "Cliques, clubs and clans," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 161-173, April.
    3. James Moody & Douglas R. White, 2000. "Structural Cohesion and Embeddedness: A Hierarchical Conception of Social Groups," Working Papers 00-08-049, Santa Fe Institute.
    4. Handcock, Mark S. & Hunter, David R. & Butts, Carter T. & Goodreau, Steven M. & Morris, Martina, 2008. "statnet: Software Tools for the Representation, Visualization, Analysis and Simulation of Network Data," Journal of Statistical Software, Foundation for Open Access Statistics, vol. 24(i01).
    5. Beáta Dávid & Tom Snijders, 2002. "Estimating the Size of the Homeless Population in Budapest, Hungary," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 291-303, August.
    6. Hunter, David R. & Goodreau, Steven M. & Handcock, Mark S., 2008. "Goodness of Fit of Social Network Models," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 103, pages 248-258, March.
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