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Feminist economics as a theory and method

In: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life

Author

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  • Drucilla K. Barker

Abstract

The Handbook illuminates complex facets of the economic and social provisioning process across the globe. The contributors – academics, policy analysts and practitioners from wide-ranging areas of expertise – discuss the methodological approaches to, and analytical tools for, conducting research on the gender dimension of economic life. They also provide analyses of major issues facing both developed and developing countries. Topics explored include civil society, discrimination, informal work, working time, central bank policy, health, education, food security, poverty, migration, environmental activism and the financial crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Drucilla K. Barker, 2013. "Feminist economics as a theory and method," Chapters, in: Deborah M. Figart & Tonia L. Warnecke (ed.), Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 2, pages 18-31, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14323_2
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9780857930941.00011.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Elissa Braunstein & Irene van Staveren & Daniele Tavani, 2011. "Embedding Care and Unpaid Work in Macroeconomic Modeling: A Structuralist Approach," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(4), pages 5-31, October.
    2. Colin Danby, 2007. "Political economy and the closet: heteronormativity in feminist economics," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 29-53.
    3. Nancy Folbre, 1995. ""Holding hands at midnight": The paradox of caring labor," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 73-92.
    4. Debreu, Gerard, 1991. "The Mathematization of Economic Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 1-7, March.
    5. Nancy Folbre & Julie A. Nelson, 2000. "For Love or Money--Or Both?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 123-140, Fall.
    6. S. Charusheela, 2009. "Social analysis and the capabilities approach: a limit to Martha Nussbaum's universalist ethics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(6), pages 1135-1152, November.
    7. Randy Albelda, 2001. "Welfare-to-Work, Farewell to Families? US Welfare Reform and Work/Family Debates," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 119-135.
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