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Weak and Strong Individual Forecasts: Additional Experimental Evidence

In: Handbook of Behavioral Finance

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  • Lucy F. Ackert
  • Bryan K. Church
  • Kirsten Ely

Abstract

The Handbook of Behavioral Finance is a comprehensive, topical and concise source of cutting-edge research on recent developments in behavioral finance.

Suggested Citation

  • Lucy F. Ackert & Bryan K. Church & Kirsten Ely, 2010. "Weak and Strong Individual Forecasts: Additional Experimental Evidence," Chapters, in: Brian Bruce (ed.), Handbook of Behavioral Finance, chapter 14, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13629_14
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lucy F. Ackert & George Athanassakos, 1997. "Prior Uncertainty, Analyst Bias, And Subsequent Abnormal Returns," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 20(2), pages 263-273, June.
    2. Trueman, Brett, 1994. "Analyst Forecasts and Herding Behavior," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 7(1), pages 97-124.
    3. Anil Arya & Shyam Sunder & Jonathan Glover, 2002. "Are Unmanaged Earnings Always Better for Shareholders?," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm295, Yale School of Management, revised 01 Feb 2003.
    4. Scharfstein, David S & Stein, Jeremy C, 1990. "Herd Behavior and Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(3), pages 465-479, June.
    5. Abhijit V. Banerjee, 1992. "A Simple Model of Herd Behavior," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(3), pages 797-817.
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