IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pve212.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Alexander Vekker

Personal Details

First Name:Alexander
Middle Name:
Last Name:Vekker
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pve212
http://www.vekker.com

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)
http://www.econ.upenn.edu/

: 215-898-7701
215-573-2057
160 McNeil Building, 3718 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6297
RePEc:edi:deupaus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Michael D. S. Morris & Alexander Vekker, 2001. "An Alternative Look at Temporary Workers, Their Choices, and the Growth in Temporary Employment," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 22(2), pages 373-390, April.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Michael D. S. Morris & Alexander Vekker, 2001. "An Alternative Look at Temporary Workers, Their Choices, and the Growth in Temporary Employment," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 22(2), pages 373-390, April.

    Cited by:

    1. C Green & J S Heywood, 2007. "Are flexible contracts bad for workers? Evidence from job satisfaction data," Working Papers 590927, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    2. Peter R. Mueser & Carolyn J. Heinrich & Kenneth Troske, 2003. "Welfare to Temporary Work: Implications for Labor Market Outcomes," Working Papers 0308, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
    3. Gail Pacheco & Bill Cochrane, 2015. "Decomposing the temporary-permanent wage gap in New Zealand," Working Papers 2015-07, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
    4. Sílvia Lopes & Maria Chambel, 2014. "Motives for Being Temporary Agency Worker: Validity Study of One Measure According to The Self-Determination Theory," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 116(1), pages 137-152, March.
    5. Cheryl Carleton & Mary Kelly, 2016. "Alternative Work Arrangements and Job Satisfaction," Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics Working Paper Series 32, Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics.
    6. Heywood, John S. & Siebert, W. Stanley & Wei, Xiangdong, 2006. "Examining the Determinants of Agency Work: Do Family Friendly Practices Play a Role?," IZA Discussion Papers 2413, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Lass, Inga & Wooden, Mark, 2017. "The Structure of the Wage Gap for Temporary Workers: Evidence from Australian Panel Data," IZA Discussion Papers 10670, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. McVicar, Duncan & Wooden, Mark & Fok, Yin King, 2017. "Contingent Employment and Labour Market Pathways: Bridge or Trap?," IZA Discussion Papers 10768, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Sharon Bolton & Maeve Houlihan & Knut Laaser, 2012. "Contingent Work and Its Contradictions: Towards a Moral Economy Framework," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 121-132, November.
    10. Fabio Berton & Matteo Richiardi & Stefano Sacchi, 2013. "Non-standard work, low-paid work and employment dynamics: evidence from an occupational perspective," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 336, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    11. Sarah Hamersma & Carolyn Heinrich, 2007. "Temporary Help Service Firms' Use of Employer Tax Credits: Implications for Disadvantaged Workers' Labor Market Outcomes," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 07-135, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    12. Judith A. Cook & Jane K. Burke-Miller & Dennis D. Grey, 2015. "Impact of Contingent Work on Subsequent Labor Force Participation and Wages of Workers with Psychiatric Disabilities," Mathematica Policy Research Reports dc9fe635fb3940d6a5740964f, Mathematica Policy Research.
    13. Chris Forde & Gary Slater, 2005. "Agency Working in Britain: Character, Consequences and Regulation," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 43(2), pages 249-271, June.
    14. Engellandt, Axel & Riphahn, Regina T., 2005. "Temporary contracts and employee effort," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 281-299, June.
    15. Petilliot, René, 2016. "How important is the type of working contract for job satisfaction of agency workers?," FZG Discussion Papers 61, University of Freiburg, Research Center for Generational Contracts (FZG).
    16. René Petilliot, 2016. "How Important is the Type of Working Contract for Job Satisfaction of Agency Workers?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 832, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    17. Imanol Nunez & Ilias Livanos, 2015. "Temps “by choice”? An Investigation of the Reasons Behind Temporary Employment Among Young Workers in Europe," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 44-66, March.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Alexander Vekker should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.