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Steven Schmeiser

Personal Details

First Name:Steven
Middle Name:
Last Name:Schmeiser
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psc581
http://steven.schmeiser.org
Terminal Degree:2009 Department of Economics; University of Minnesota (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Mount Holyoke College

South Hadley, Massachusetts (United States)
http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/econ/

: 538-2432
538-2512
50 College Street, South Hadley, MA 01075
RePEc:edi:demthus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Schmeiser Steven, 2016. "Spillovers in Attribute Advertising," Review of Marketing Science, De Gruyter, vol. 14(1), pages 69-87, June.
  2. Schmeiser, Steven, 2015. "The size distribution of websites," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 62-68.
  3. Schmeiser, Steven, 2014. "Consumer inference and the regulation of consumer information," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 192-200.
  4. Steven Schmeiser, 2014. "Consumer preference changes in the logit demand model," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(7), pages 463-465, May.
  5. Steven Schmeiser, 2014. "Board response to majority outsider regulation," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 19-29, January.
  6. Schmeiser, Steven, 2012. "Corporate board dynamics: Directors voting for directors," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 505-524.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Schmeiser, Steven, 2014. "Consumer inference and the regulation of consumer information," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 192-200.

    Cited by:

    1. Train, Kenneth, 2015. "Welfare calculations in discrete choice models when anticipated and experienced attributes differ: A guide with examples," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 15-22.
    2. Birg, Laura & VoƟwinkel, Jan S., 2014. "Minimum quality standards and compulsory labeling: More than the sum of its parts," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 226, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    3. Daniel McFadden, 2017. "Foundations of Welfare Economics and Product Market Applications," NBER Working Papers 23535, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Steven Schmeiser, 2014. "Consumer preference changes in the logit demand model," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(7), pages 463-465, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Schmeiser, Steven, 2014. "Consumer inference and the regulation of consumer information," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 192-200.

More information

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