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Saman Rashid

Personal Details

First Name:Saman
Middle Name:
Last Name:Rashid
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pra319
http://www.miun.se/personal/samanrashid
+46101428550

Affiliation

Avdelningen för ekonomi, geografi, juridik och turism
Mittuniversitetet

Sundsvall/Östersund, Sweden
https://www.miun.se/mot-mittuniversitetet/Organisation/institutioner/ejt/
RePEc:edi:ismiuse (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Aycan, Çelikaksoy & Lena, Nekby & Saman, Rashid, 2009. "Assortative Mating by Ethnic Background and Education in Sweden: The Role of Parental Composition on Partner Choice," SULCIS Working Papers 2009:7, Stockholm University, Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
  2. Rashid, Saman, 2004. "Immigrants' Income and Family Migration," Umeå Economic Studies 625, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
  3. Rashid, Saman, 2004. "Internal migration and income of immigrant families," Umeå Economic Studies 624, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
  4. Rashid, Saman, 2004. "Married immigrant women and employment.The role of family investments," Umeå Economic Studies 623, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
  5. Rashid, Saman, 2004. "Immigrant Earnings, Assimilation and Heterogeneity," Umeå Economic Studies 622, Umeå University, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Saman Rashid & Anna Olofsson, 2021. "Worried in Sweden: the effects of terrorism abroad and news media at home on terror-related worry," Journal of Risk Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 62-77, January.
  2. Anna Olofsson & Saman Rashid, 2011. "The White (Male) Effect and Risk Perception: Can Equality Make a Difference?," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 31(6), pages 1016-1032, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Aycan, Çelikaksoy & Lena, Nekby & Saman, Rashid, 2009. "Assortative Mating by Ethnic Background and Education in Sweden: The Role of Parental Composition on Partner Choice," SULCIS Working Papers 2009:7, Stockholm University, Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.

    Cited by:

    1. Espinosa, Hector & Guzman, Ivan, 2018. "Mercado Matrimonial Dominicano: Impacto del Nivel de Educación en el Proceso de Selección de Parejas y su Vinculación con el Mercado Laboral [Marriage Market in the Dominican Republic: Impact of Ed," MPRA Paper 92112, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Nekby, Lena, 2010. "Same, Same but (Initially) Different? The Social Integration of Natives and Immigrants in Sweden," SULCIS Working Papers 2010:4, Stockholm University, Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.

  2. Rashid, Saman, 2004. "Immigrants' Income and Family Migration," Umeå Economic Studies 625, Umeå University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Lundström, Christian, 2017. "On the Returns of Trend-Following Trading Strategies," Umeå Economic Studies 948, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    2. Raattamaa, Tomas, 2016. "Essays on Delegated Search and Temporary Work Agencies," Umeå Economic Studies 935, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    3. Krishna Pendakur & Ravi Pendakur, 2007. "Minority Earnings Disparity Across the Distribution," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 33(1), pages 41-62, March.

  3. Rashid, Saman, 2004. "Internal migration and income of immigrant families," Umeå Economic Studies 624, Umeå University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Julia Bock-Schappelwein & Peter Huber, 2015. "Auswirkungen einer Erleichterung des Arbeitsmarktzuganges für Asylsuchende in Österreich," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 59410.
    2. Pieter Bevelander & Ravi Pendakur, 2012. "The labour market integration of refugee and family reunion immigrants: A comparison of outcomes in Canada and Sweden," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2012041, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
    3. Fernando Mata & Ravi Pendakur, 2017. "Of Intake and Outcomes: Wage Trajectories of Immigrant Classes in Canada," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 829-844, August.
    4. Bevelander, Pieter & Pendakur, Ravi, 2012. "The Labour Market Integration of Refugee and Family Reunion Immigrants: A Comparison of Outcomes in Canada and Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 6924, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Cheng, Zhiming & Wang, Ben Zhe & Taksa, Lucy, 2017. "Labour Force Participation and Employment of Humanitarian Migrants: Evidence from the Building a New Life in Australia Longitudinal Data," GLO Discussion Paper Series 106, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

  4. Rashid, Saman, 2004. "Immigrant Earnings, Assimilation and Heterogeneity," Umeå Economic Studies 622, Umeå University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Rashid, Saman, 2004. "Married immigrant women and employment.The role of family investments," Umeå Economic Studies 623, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    2. Rödin, Magnus & Özcan, Gülay, 2011. "Is It How You Look or Speak That Matters? - An Experimental Study Exploring the Mechanisms of Ethnic Discrimination," Research Papers in Economics 2011:12, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    3. Nekby, Lena & Vilhelmsson, Roger & Özcan, Gülay, 2007. "Do Domestic Educations Even Out the Playing Field? Ethnic Labor Market Gaps in Sweden," Research Papers in Economics 2007:6, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    4. Rödin, Magnus & Özcan, Gülay, 2011. "Is It How You Look or Speak That Matters? - An Experimental Study Exploring the Mechanisms of Ethnic Discrimination," SULCIS Working Papers 2011:3, Stockholm University, Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.

Articles

  1. Anna Olofsson & Saman Rashid, 2011. "The White (Male) Effect and Risk Perception: Can Equality Make a Difference?," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 31(6), pages 1016-1032, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Nelson, Julie A., 2012. "Are Women Really More Risk-Averse than Men?," Working Papers 179104, Tufts University, Global Development and Environment Institute.
    2. Vicki S. Freimuth & Amelia Jamison & Gregory Hancock & Donald Musa & Karen Hilyard & Sandra Crouse Quinn, 2017. "The Role of Risk Perception in Flu Vaccine Behavior among African‐American and White Adults in the United States," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 37(11), pages 2150-2163, November.
    3. Nadine Lehrer & Gretchen Sneegas, 2018. "Beyond polarization: using Q methodology to explore stakeholders’ views on pesticide use, and related risks for agricultural workers, in Washington State’s tree fruit industry," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 35(1), pages 131-147, March.
    4. Prati, Gabriele & Fraboni, Federico & De Angelis, Marco & Pietrantoni, Luca & Johnson, Daniel & Shires, Jeremy, 2019. "Gender differences in cycling patterns and attitudes towards cycling in a sample of European regular cyclists," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 1-7.
    5. An Gie Yong & Louise Lemyre & Celine Pinsent & Daniel Krewski, 2017. "Risk Perception and Disaster Preparedness in Immigrants and Canadian‐Born Adults: Analysis of a National Survey on Similarities and Differences," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 37(12), pages 2321-2333, December.
    6. Loredana Antronico & Roberto Coscarelli & Francesco De Pascale & Dante Di Matteo, 2020. "Climate Change and Social Perception: A Case Study in Southern Italy," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(17), pages 1-24, August.
    7. Elizabeth A Albright & Deserai Crow, 2019. "Beliefs about climate change in the aftermath of extreme flooding," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 155(1), pages 1-17, July.
    8. Ann Bostrom & Adam L. Hayes & Katherine M. Crosman, 2019. "Efficacy, Action, and Support for Reducing Climate Change Risks," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 39(4), pages 805-828, April.
    9. Ahmad Saleh Safi & William James Smith & Zhnongwei Liu, 2012. "Rural Nevada and Climate Change: Vulnerability, Beliefs, and Risk Perception," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 32(6), pages 1041-1059, June.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (2) 2004-03-07 2004-03-22
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2004-03-22
  3. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2009-06-03
  4. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2009-06-03
  5. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2004-03-22
  6. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2009-06-03

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