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David T. Mitchell

Personal Details

First Name:David
Middle Name:T.
Last Name:Mitchell
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmi212
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://uca.edu/efirm/facultystaff/dmitchell/
EFIRM, COB 211 G University of Central Arkansas 301 N. Donaghey Ave. Conway, AR 72205

Affiliation

(74%) Department of Economics, Finance, and Insurance and Risk Management
University of Central Arkansas

Conway, Arkansas (United States)
http://www.uca.edu/efirm/index.php

: (501) 450-3109

201 Donaghey, Conway, AR 72035-0001
RePEc:edi:deucaus (more details at EDIRC)

(26%) Southern Journal of Entrepreneurship (Southern Journal of Entrepreneurship)

http://www.southernjournalentrepreneurship.org/
Columbus, GA

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Mitchell, David & Hunsader, Kenneth & Parker, Scott, 2011. "A Futures Trading Experiment: An Active Classroom Approach to Learning," MPRA Paper 56496, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2011.
  2. Mitchell, David & Rebelein, Robert P. & Schneider, Patricia & Simpson, Nicole B. & Eric Fisher, "undated". "A Classroom Experiment on Exchange Rate Determination with Purchasing Power Parity," Vassar College Department of Economics Working Paper Series 87, Vassar College Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Marta Podemska-Mikluch & Darwyyn Deyo & David T. Mitchell, 2016. "Public Choice Lessons from the Wizarding World of Harry Potter," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 31(Spring 20), pages 57-69.
  2. David T. Mitchell & Danny R. Hughes & Noel D. Campbell, 2014. "Are Powerful Majorities Inefficient for Parties and Efficient for Taxpayers?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 42(1), pages 117-138, January.
  3. D. R. Hughes & D. T. Mitchell & D. P. Molinari, 2011. "Heeding the call: seminary enrollment and the business cycle," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(5), pages 433-437.
  4. David T. Mitchell & Robert P. Rebelein & Patricia H. Schneider & Nicole B. Simpson & Eric Fisher, 2009. "A Classroom Experiment on Exchange Rate Determination with Purchasing Power Parity," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(2), pages 150-165, April.
  5. David T. Mitchell & Noel D. Campbell, 2009. "U.S. Corruption and Business Venturing," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(5), pages 1135-1152, November.
  6. Noel D. Campbell & R. Zachary Finney & David T. Mitchell, 2007. "Hunting The Whale: More Evidence on State Government Leviathans," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 566-580, October.
  7. David T. Mitchell, 2006. "A Pitfall of New Growth Theory: Rhetoric, Rent Seeking and the Semi-Informed Voter," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 22(Fall 2006), pages 147-167.
  8. Dean Stansel and David T. Mitchell, 1982. "State Fiscal Crises: Are Rapid Spending Increases to Blame?," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 2(3), pages 435-448, Winter.

Chapters

  1. Noel D. Campbell & David T. Mitchell & Tammy M. Rogers, 2014. "Measures of entrepreneurship and institutions: a more formal robustness check," Chapters,in: Entrepreneurial Action, Public Policy, and Economic Outcomes, chapter 4, pages 52-82 Edward Elgar Publishing.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Mitchell, David & Hunsader, Kenneth & Parker, Scott, 2011. "A Futures Trading Experiment: An Active Classroom Approach to Learning," MPRA Paper 56496, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2011.

    Cited by:

    1. Joshua C. Hall & Marta Podemska-Mikluch, 2015. "Teaching the Economic Way of Thinking Through Op-eds," Working Papers 15-10, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.

  2. Mitchell, David & Rebelein, Robert P. & Schneider, Patricia & Simpson, Nicole B. & Eric Fisher, "undated". "A Classroom Experiment on Exchange Rate Determination with Purchasing Power Parity," Vassar College Department of Economics Working Paper Series 87, Vassar College Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Jannett Highfill & Raymond Wojcikewych, 2011. "The U.S.-China Exchange Rate Debate: Using Currency Offer Curves," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 17(4), pages 386-396, November.
    2. KimMarie McGoldrick, 2010. "Advancing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Economics," Chapters,in: Teaching Innovations in Economics, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Mitchell, David & Hunsader, Kenneth & Parker, Scott, 2011. "A Futures Trading Experiment: An Active Classroom Approach to Learning," MPRA Paper 56496, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2011.

Articles

  1. David T. Mitchell & Robert P. Rebelein & Patricia H. Schneider & Nicole B. Simpson & Eric Fisher, 2009. "A Classroom Experiment on Exchange Rate Determination with Purchasing Power Parity," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(2), pages 150-165, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Noel D. Campbell & R. Zachary Finney & David T. Mitchell, 2007. "Hunting The Whale: More Evidence on State Government Leviathans," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 566-580, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter Calcagno & Edward Lopez, 2012. "Divided we vote," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 151(3), pages 517-536, June.

  3. Dean Stansel and David T. Mitchell, 1982. "State Fiscal Crises: Are Rapid Spending Increases to Blame?," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 2(3), pages 435-448, Winter.

    Cited by:

    1. John D. Merrifield & Barry W. Poulson, 2016. "A Dynamic Scoring Simulation Analysis of How TEL Design Choices Impact Government Expansion," Journal of Economic and Financial Studies (JEFS), LAR Center Press, vol. 4(2), pages 60-68, April.
    2. Splinter, David, 2017. "State pension contributions and fiscal stress," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(01), pages 65-80, January.
    3. John Merrifield & Barry W. Poulson, 2014. "State Fiscal Policies for Budget Stabilization and Economic Growth: A Dynamic Scoring Analysis," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 34(1), pages 47-81, Winter.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2007-02-17
  2. NEP-IFN: International Finance (1) 2007-02-17

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