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A Classroom Experiment on Exchange Rate Determination with Purchasing Power Parity


  • David T. Mitchell
  • Robert P. Rebelein
  • Patricia H. Schneider
  • Nicole B. Simpson
  • Eric Fisher


The authors developed a classroom experiment on exchange rate determination appropriate for undergraduate courses in macroeconomics and international economics. In the experiment, students represent citizens from different countries and need to obtain currency to purchase goods. By participating in an auction to buy currency, students gain a better understanding of currency markets and exchange rates. The implicit framework for exchange rate determination is one in which prices are perfectly flexible (in the long run) so that purchasing power parity (PPP) prevails. Additional treatments allow students to examine the effects of price changes, tariffs, and nontradable goods on the exchange rate and to explore the possible resulting deviations from PPP. The experiment is suitable for classes of 8 to 50 students and can be run in as short a period as 30 minutes.

Suggested Citation

  • David T. Mitchell & Robert P. Rebelein & Patricia H. Schneider & Nicole B. Simpson & Eric Fisher, 2009. "A Classroom Experiment on Exchange Rate Determination with Purchasing Power Parity," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(2), pages 150-165, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:40:y:2009:i:2:p:150-165 DOI: 10.3200/JECE.40.2.150-165

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lisa R. Anderson & Sarah L. Stafford, 2006. "Does Crime Pay? A Classroom Demonstration of Monitoring and Enforcement," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 72(4), pages 1016-1025, April.
    2. Denise Hazlett, 2003. "A Search-Theoretic Classroom Experiment with Money," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 2(1), pages 80-90.
    3. Alan M. Taylor & Mark P. Taylor, 2004. "The Purchasing Power Parity Debate," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(4), pages 135-158, Fall.
    4. Denise Hazlett & Cynthia D. Hill, 2003. "Calculating the Candy Price Index: A Classroom Inflation Experiment," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(3), pages 214-223, January.
    5. Brauer, Jurgen & Delemeester, Greg, 2001. " Games Economists Play: A Survey of Non-computerized Classroom-Games for College Economics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 221-236, April.
    6. Bradley T. Ewing & Jamie B. Kruse & Mark A. Thompson, 2004. "Money Demand and Risk: A Classroom Experiment," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(3), pages 243-250, July.
    7. Charles A. Holt, 1999. "Teaching Economics with Classroom Experiments: A Symposium," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 65(3), pages 603-610, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jannett Highfill & Raymond Wojcikewych, 2011. "The U.S.-China Exchange Rate Debate: Using Currency Offer Curves," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 17(4), pages 386-396, November.
    2. KimMarie McGoldrick, 2010. "Advancing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Economics," Chapters,in: Teaching Innovations in Economics, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. repec:kap:iaecre:v:17:y:2011:i:4:p:386-396 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Mitchell, David & Hunsader, Kenneth & Parker, Scott, 2011. "A Futures Trading Experiment: An Active Classroom Approach to Learning," MPRA Paper 56496, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2011.

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