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Paul Gaggl

Personal Details

First Name:Paul
Middle Name:
Last Name:Gaggl
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pga319
http://belkcollegeofbusiness.uncc.edu/pgaggl/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Belk College of Business
University of North Carolina-Charlotte

Charlotte, North Carolina (United States)
http://www.belkcollege.uncc.edu/default.asp?id=67&objId=3




RePEc:edi:denccus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Software

Working papers

  1. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2019. "Capital Composition and the Declining Labor Share," CESifo Working Paper Series 7996, CESifo.
  2. Paul Gaggl & Rowena Gray & Ioana Marinescu & Miguel Morin, 2019. "Does Electricity Drive Structural Transformation? Evidence from the United States," CESifo Working Paper Series 7930, CESifo.
  3. Eden,Maya & Gaggl,Paul, 2015. "On the welfare implications of automation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7487, The World Bank.
  4. Eden,Maya & Gaggl,Paul, 2015. "Do poor countries really need more IT ? the role of relative prices and industrial composition," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7352, The World Bank.
  5. Gaggl, P & Wright, GC, 2014. "A Short-Run View of What Computers Do: Evidence from a UK Tax Incentive," Economics Discussion Papers 10012, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  6. Paul Gaggl & Sylvia Kaufmann, 2014. "The Cyclical Component of Labor Market Polarization and Jobless Recoveries in the US," Working Papers 14.03, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.
  7. Paul Gaggl & Sandra Steindl, 2007. "Business Cycles and Growth: A Survey," WIFO Working Papers 308, WIFO.

Articles

  1. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2020. "Do Poor Countries Really Need More IT?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 34(1), pages 48-62.
  2. Gaggl, Paul & Valderrama, Maria Teresa, 2019. "Do Banks Take Unusual Risks When Interest Rates Are Expected To Stay Low For A Long Time?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(6), pages 2409-2433, September.
  3. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2018. "On the Welfare Implications of Automation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 29, pages 15-43, July.
  4. Paul Gaggl & Greg C. Wright, 2017. "A Short-Run View of What Computers Do: Evidence from a UK Tax Incentive," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 262-294, July.
  5. Stivender Carol O. & Gaggl Paul & Amato Louis H. & Farrow-Chestnut Tonya E., 2016. "The Impact of Education Earmarking on State-Level Lottery Sales," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(3), pages 1473-1500, September.
  6. Paul Gaggl & Maria Teresa Valderrama, 2010. "Does a Low Interest Rate Environment Affect Risk Taking in Austria?," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 4, pages 32-48.
  7. Paul Gaggl & Jürgen Janger, 2009. "Will the Great Recession Lead to a Lasting Impact on Potential Output in Austria?," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 3, pages 26-52.
  8. Paul Gaggl, 2009. "The Role of Exchange Rate Movements for Prices in the Euro Area," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 2, pages 83-103.
  9. Paul Gaggl & Serguei Kaniovski & Klaus Prettner & Thomas Url, 2009. "The short and long-run interdependencies between the Eurozone and the USA," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 209-227, May.

Software components

  1. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2017. "Code and data files for "On the Welfare Implications of Automation"," Computer Codes 16-380, Review of Economic Dynamics.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Eden,Maya & Gaggl,Paul, 2015. "On the welfare implications of automation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7487, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Alesina & Michele Battisti & Joseph Zeira, 2018. "Technology and labor regulations: theory and evidence," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 41-78, March.
    2. Prettner, Klaus & Strulik, Holger, 2017. "The lost race against the machine: Automation, education, and inequality in an R&D-based growth model," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 329, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    3. Popović, Milenko, 2018. "Technological Progress, Globalization, and Secular Stagnation," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 59-100.
    4. Zsofia Barany & Christian Siegel, 2019. "Engines of Sectoral Labor Productivity Growth," 2019 Meeting Papers 872, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Brinca, Pedro & Oliveira, João & Duarte, João, 2019. "Investment-Specific Technological Change, Taxation and Inequality in the U.S," MPRA Paper 91463, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Richiardi, Matteo G. & Valenzuela, Luis, 2019. "Firm Heterogeneity and the Aggregate Labour Share," MPRA Paper 94561, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Cords, Dario & Prettner, Klaus, 2019. "Technological Unemployment Revisited: Automation in a Search and Matching Framework," GLO Discussion Paper Series 308, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    8. Alexandr Kopytov & Nikolai Roussanov & Mathieu Taschereau-Dumouchel, 2018. "Short-Run Pain, Long-Run Gain? Recessions and Technological Transformation," NBER Working Papers 24373, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Perera-Tallo, Fernando, 2017. "Growing income inequality due to biased technological change," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 23-38.
    10. José L. Torres & Pablo Casas, 2020. "Automation, Automatic Capital Returns, and the Functional Income Distribution," Working Papers 2020-02, Universidad de Málaga, Department of Economic Theory, Málaga Economic Theory Research Center.
    11. Andrew Berg & Edward F Buffie & Luis-Felipe Zanna, 2018. "Should We Fear the Robot Revolution? (The Correct Answer is Yes)," IMF Working Papers 18/116, International Monetary Fund.
    12. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2019. "Capital Composition and the Declining Labor Share," CESifo Working Paper Series 7996, CESifo.
    13. Loukas Karabarbounis & Brent Neiman, 2018. "Accounting for Factorless Income," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2018, volume 33, pages 167-228, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Asli Leblebicioglu & Ariel Weinberger, 2017. "Credit and the Labor Share: Evidence from U.S. States," Globalization Institute Working Papers 326, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, revised 01 Aug 2017.
    15. De Dominicis, Piero, 2020. "Routinization and Covid-19: a comparison between United States and Portugal," MPRA Paper 101003, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Musa Orak, 2017. "Capital-Task Complementarity and the Decline of the U.S. Labor Share of Income," International Finance Discussion Papers 1200, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), revised Mar 2017.
    17. vom Lehn, Christian, 2018. "Understanding the decline in the U.S. labor share: Evidence from occupational tasks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 191-220.
    18. Matthias Kehrig & Nicolas Vincent, 2017. "Growing Productivity without Growing Wages: The Micro-Level Anatomy of the Aggregate Labor Share Decline," CESifo Working Paper Series 6454, CESifo.
    19. Cortes, Guido Matias & Jaimovich, Nir & Siu, Henry E., 2017. "Disappearing routine jobs: Who, how, and why?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 69-87.
    20. vom Lehn, Christian, 2020. "Labor market polarization, the decline of routine work, and technological change: A quantitative analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 62-80.
    21. Ferrreira, Ana Melissa, 2019. "Skill-Biased Technological Change and Inequality in the U.S," MPRA Paper 93914, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    22. Coelho, José, 2020. "Universal basic income and skill-biased technological change," MPRA Paper 99195, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 20 Mar 2020.
    23. Joachim Hubmer, 2019. "The Race Between Preferences and Technology," 2019 Meeting Papers 1430, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    24. Gasteiger, Emanuel & Prettner, Klaus, 2020. "Automation, stagnation, and the implications of a robot tax," ECON WPS - Vienna University of Technology Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 02/2020, Vienna University of Technology, Institute for Mathematical Methods in Economics, Research Group Economics (ECON).
    25. Leblebicioglu, Asli & Weinberger, Ariel, 2018. "Openness and Factor Shares: Is Globalization Always Bad for Labor?," MPRA Paper 90270, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    26. Stähler, Nikolai, 2020. "The impact of aging and automation on the macroeconomy and inequality," Discussion Papers 30/2020, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    27. Giovanni Gallipoli & Christos A. Makridis, 2017. "Structural Transformation and the Rise of Information Technology," Working Paper series 17-30, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    28. Kehrig, Matthias, 2018. "Comment on “Computerizing industries and routinizing jobs: Explaining trends in aggregate productivity” by Sangmin Aum, Sang Yoon (Tim) Lee and Yongseok Shin," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 22-28.
    29. Nóbrega, Valter, 2020. "Optimal Taxation and Investment-Specific Technological Change," MPRA Paper 98917, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  2. Eden,Maya & Gaggl,Paul, 2015. "Do poor countries really need more IT ? the role of relative prices and industrial composition," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7352, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2018. "On the Welfare Implications of Automation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 29, pages 15-43, July.
    2. Roma Keister & Piotr Lewandowski, 2016. "A routine transition? Causes and consequences of the changing content of jobs in Central and Eastern Europe," IBS Policy Papers 05/2016, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    3. Lewandowski, Piotr & Park, Albert & Hardy, Wojciech & Du, Yang, 2019. "Technology, Skills, and Globalization: Explaining International Differences in Routine and Nonroutine Work Using Survey Data," IZA Discussion Papers 12339, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Wojciech Hardy & Roma Keister & Piotr Lewandowski, 2016. "Technology Or Upskilling? Trends In The Task Composition Of Jobs In Central And Eastern Europe," IBS Working Papers 01/2016, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    5. Piotr Lewandowski, 2018. "How does technology change the nature of work? Poland vs. the EU," IBS Policy Papers 02/2018, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    6. Marta Palczynska, 2018. "Wage premia for skills: The complementarity of cognitive and non-cognitive skills," IBS Working Papers 09/2018, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.

  3. Gaggl, P & Wright, GC, 2014. "A Short-Run View of What Computers Do: Evidence from a UK Tax Incentive," Economics Discussion Papers 10012, University of Essex, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Guido Matias Cortes & Diego M. Morris, 2019. "Are Routine Jobs Moving South? Evidence from Changes in the Occupational Structure of Employment in the U.S. and Mexico," Working Paper series 19-15, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    2. Almeida,Rita Kullberg & Fernandes,Ana Margarida & Viollaz,Mariana & Almeida,Rita Kullberg & Fernandes,Ana Margarida & Viollaz,Mariana, 2017. "Does the adoption of complex software impact employment composition and the skill content of occupations ? evidence from Chilean firms," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8110, The World Bank.
    3. Eckhardt Bode & Stephan Brunow & Ingrid Ott & Alina Sorgner, 2016. "Worker Personality: Another Skill Bias beyond Education in the Digital Age," Jena Economic Research Papers 2016-020, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    4. James Bessen, 2018. "Artificial Intelligence and Jobs: The Role of Demand," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence: An Agenda, pages 291-307, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Vazquez,Emmanuel Jose & Winkler,Hernan Jorge, 2017. "How is the internet changing labor market arrangements ? evidence from telecommunications reforms in Europe," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7976, The World Bank.
    6. Rowena Gray & Giulia Montresor & Greg C. Wright, 2017. "Processing Immigration Shocks: Firm Responses on the Innovation Margin," CESifo Working Paper Series 6624, CESifo.
    7. Jeff Borland & Michael Coelli, 2017. "Are Robots Taking Our Jobs?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 50(4), pages 377-397, December.
    8. Paul Gaggl & Sylvia Kaufmann, 2014. "The Cyclical Component of Labor Market Polarization and Jobless Recoveries in the US," Working Papers 14.03, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.
    9. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2018. "On the Welfare Implications of Automation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 29, pages 15-43, July.
    10. Mariana Viollaz, 2018. "ICT Adoption in Micro and Small Firms: Can Internet Access Improve Labour Productivity?," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0223, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    11. Zhang, Jingjing & Leoncini, Riccardo & Tsai, Yingyi, 2018. "Intellectual property rights protection, labour mobility and wage inequality," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 239-244.
    12. Cortes, Guido Matias & Jaimovich, Nir & Siu, Henry E., 2017. "Disappearing routine jobs: Who, how, and why?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 69-87.
    13. Cortes, Matias & Salvatori, Andrea, 2016. "Delving into the Demand Side: Changes in Workplace Specialization and Job Polarization," IZA Discussion Papers 10120, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Salvatori, Andrea, 2015. "The Anatomy of Job Polarisation in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 9193, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Gaggl, P & Wright, GC, 2014. "A Short-Run View of What Computers Do: Evidence from a UK Tax Incentive," Economics Discussion Papers 10012, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    16. Mariana Viollaz, 2017. "ICT Adoption in Micro and Small Firms: Can Internet Access Improve Labor Productivity?," CESifo Working Paper Series 6839, CESifo.
    17. Dechezleprêtre, Antoine & Hémous, David & olsen, morten & Zanella, carlo, 2019. "Automating Labor: Evidence from Firm-level Patent Data," CEPR Discussion Papers 14249, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    18. Valeria Cirillo & Rinaldo Evangelista & Dario Guarascio & Matteo Sostero, 2019. "Digitalization, routineness and employment: An exploration on Italian task-based data," LEM Papers Series 2019/18, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.

  4. Paul Gaggl & Sylvia Kaufmann, 2014. "The Cyclical Component of Labor Market Polarization and Jobless Recoveries in the US," Working Papers 14.03, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.

    Cited by:

    1. Sylvia Kaufmann, 2014. "K-state switching models with time-varying transition distributions – Does credit growth signal stronger effects of variables on inflation?," Working Papers 14.04, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.
    2. Sylvia Kaufmann, 2016. "Hidden Markov models in time series, with applications in economics," Working Papers 16.06, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.
    3. Zhang, Wen, 2019. "Deciphering the causes for the post-1990 slow output recoveries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 28-34.
    4. Nir Jaimovich, 2015. "The Research Agenda: Nir Jaimovich on The changing nature of business cycles," EconomicDynamics Newsletter, Review of Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(2), November.

  5. Paul Gaggl & Sandra Steindl, 2007. "Business Cycles and Growth: A Survey," WIFO Working Papers 308, WIFO.

    Cited by:

    1. Elena Andreou & Alessandra Pelloni & Marianne Sensier, 2008. "Is Volatility Good for Growth? Evidence from the G7," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 97, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    2. Barbara Annicchiarico & Luisa Corrado & Alessandra Pelloni, 2008. "Long-Term Growth and Short-Term Volatility: The Labour Market Nexus," CDMA Working Paper Series 200806, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis.
    3. Barbara Annicchiarico & Alessandra Pelloni, 2013. "Productivity Growth and Volatility: How Important Are Wage and Price Rigidities?," Working Paper series 02_13, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    4. Francesco Bogliacino & Dario Guarascio & Mario Pianta & Matteo Lucchese, 2015. "Business Cycles, Technology and Exports," Documentos de Trabajo - Escuela de Economía 012974, Universidad Nacional de Colombia -FCE - CID.
    5. Matteo Lucchese & Mario Pianta, 2012. "Innovation and Employment in Economic Cycles," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 54(2), pages 341-359, June.
    6. Barbara Annicchiarico & Luisa Corrado & Alessandra Pelloni, 2008. "Volatility, Growth and Labour Elasticity," Working Paper series 32_08, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    7. Bisio, Laura & Ventura, Luigi, 2012. "Growth and volatility reconsidered: reconciling opposite views," MPRA Paper 35937, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2020. "Do Poor Countries Really Need More IT?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 34(1), pages 48-62.

    Cited by:

    1. Lewandowski, Piotr & Park, Albert & Schotte, Simone, 2020. "The Global Distribution of Routine and Non-Routine Work," IZA Discussion Papers 13384, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  2. Gaggl, Paul & Valderrama, Maria Teresa, 2019. "Do Banks Take Unusual Risks When Interest Rates Are Expected To Stay Low For A Long Time?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(6), pages 2409-2433, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Byrne, David & Kelly, Robert, 2019. "Monetary policy expectations and risk-taking among U.S. banks," Research Technical Papers 6/RT/19, Central Bank of Ireland.

  3. Maya Eden & Paul Gaggl, 2018. "On the Welfare Implications of Automation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 29, pages 15-43, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Paul Gaggl & Greg C. Wright, 2017. "A Short-Run View of What Computers Do: Evidence from a UK Tax Incentive," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 262-294, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Stivender Carol O. & Gaggl Paul & Amato Louis H. & Farrow-Chestnut Tonya E., 2016. "The Impact of Education Earmarking on State-Level Lottery Sales," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(3), pages 1473-1500, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Flores-Macías, Gustavo A., 2018. "Building support for taxation in developing countries: Experimental evidence from Mexico," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 13-24.

  6. Paul Gaggl & Maria Teresa Valderrama, 2010. "Does a Low Interest Rate Environment Affect Risk Taking in Austria?," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 4, pages 32-48.

    Cited by:

    1. Gabriel Jiménez & Steven Ongena & José Luis Peydró & Jesús Saurina, 2009. "Hazardous times for monetary policy: What do twenty-three million bank loans say about the effects of monetary policy on credit risk-taking?," Working Papers 0833, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    2. Ongena, Steven & Tümer-Alkan, Günseli & von Westernhagen, Natalja, 2015. "Do exposures to sagging real estate, subprime or conduits abroad lead to contraction and flight to quality in bank lending at home?," Discussion Papers 09/2015, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    3. Huang, Yiping & Li, Xiang & Wang, Chu, 2019. "What does peer-to-peer lending evidence say about the risk-taking channel of monetary policy?," BOFIT Discussion Papers 16/2019, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    4. Yener Altunbas & Leonardo Gambacorta & David Marques-Ibanez, 2014. "Does Monetary Policy Affect Bank Risk?," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 10(1), pages 95-136, March.
    5. Gabriel Jiménez & Steven Ongena & José-Luis Peydró & Jesús Saurina, 2017. "“In the Short Run Blasé, In the Long Run Risqué”," Schmalenbach Business Review, Springer;Schmalenbach-Gesellschaft, vol. 18(3), pages 181-226, August.
    6. Mite Miteski & Ana Mitreska & Mihajlo Vaskov, 2019. "The risk-taking channel of monetary policy in Macedonia: evidence from credit registry data," IFC Bulletins chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.),Are post-crisis statistical initiatives completed?, volume 49, Bank for International Settlements.
    7. Huang, Yiping & Li, Xiang & Wang, Chu, 2019. "What does peer-to-peer lending evidence say about the risk-taking channel of monetary policy?," IWH Discussion Papers 14/2019, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    8. Yiping Huang & Xiang Li & Chu Wang, 2019. "What Does Peer-To-Peer Lending Evidence Say about the Risk-Taking Channel of Monetary Policy?," CESifo Working Paper Series 7792, CESifo.
    9. Ekin Ayse Ozsuca & Elif Akbostanci, 2012. "An Empirical Analysis of the Risk Taking Channel of Monetary Policy in Turkey," ERC Working Papers 1208, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Dec 2012.
    10. Nguyen, Vu Hong Thai & Boateng, Agyenim, 2015. "An analysis of involuntary excess reserves, monetary policy and risk-taking behaviour of Chinese Banks," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 63-72.
    11. Ramayandi, Arief & Rawat, Umang & Tang, Hsiao Chink, 2014. "Can Low Interest Rates be Harmful: An Assessment of the Bank Risk-Taking Channel in Asia," Working Papers on Regional Economic Integration 123, Asian Development Bank.
    12. Brana, Sophie & Campmas, Alexandra & Lapteacru, Ion, 2019. "(Un)Conventional monetary policy and bank risk-taking: A nonlinear relationship," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 576-593.
    13. Mite Miteski & Ana Mitreska & Mihajlo Vaskov, 2018. "The Risk-Taking Channel of Monetary Policy in Macedonia: Evidence from Credit Registry Data," Working Papers 2018-07, National Bank of the Republic of North Macedonia.

  7. Paul Gaggl & Jürgen Janger, 2009. "Will the Great Recession Lead to a Lasting Impact on Potential Output in Austria?," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 3, pages 26-52.

    Cited by:

    1. Christian Ragacs & Klaus Vondra, 2010. "Subdued Economic Recovery given Necessary Fiscal Consolidation: Economic Outlook for Austria from 2010 to 2012 (June 2010)," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 2, pages 6-32.
    2. Dominik Bernhofer & Octavio Fernández-Amador & Martin Gächter & Friedrich Sindermann, 2014. "Finance, potential output and the business cycle," Chapters, in: Ewald Nowotny & Doris Ritzberger-Grünwald & Peter Backé (ed.),Financial Cycles and the Real Economy, chapter 14, pages 235-264, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Robert F. Martin & Teyanna Munyan & Beth Anne Wilson, 2014. "Potential Output and Recessions : Are We Fooling Ourselves?," IFDP Notes 2014-11-12, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Jürgen Janger & Julia Bock-Schappelwein & Michael Böheim & Ulrike Famira-Mühlberger & Thomas Horvath & Daniela Kletzan-Slamanig & Stefan Schönfelder & Margit Schratzenstaller & Maria M. Hofmarcher-Hol, 2014. "Monitoring of Austria's Efforts Within the Europe 2020 Strategy. Update 2013-14," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 47415, July.
    5. Jürgen Janger & Julia Bock-Schappelwein & Michael Böheim & Ulrike Famira-Mühlberger & Thomas Horvath & Daniela Kletzan-Slamanig & Margit Schratzenstaller & Maria M. Hofmarcher-Holzhacker, 2015. "Monitoring of Austria's Efforts Within the Europe 2020 Strategy. Update 2014-15," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 58130, July.

  8. Paul Gaggl, 2009. "The Role of Exchange Rate Movements for Prices in the Euro Area," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 2, pages 83-103.

    Cited by:

    1. Eva Ortega & Chiara Osbat, 2020. "Exchange rate pass-through in the euro area and EU countries," Occasional Papers 2016, Banco de España;Occasional Papers Homepage.

  9. Paul Gaggl & Serguei Kaniovski & Klaus Prettner & Thomas Url, 2009. "The short and long-run interdependencies between the Eurozone and the USA," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 209-227, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Prettner & Robert Kunst, 2012. "The dynamic interrelations between unequal neighbors: an Austro-German case study," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 741-761, October.
    2. Prettner, Catherine & Prettner, Klaus, 2012. "After Two Decades of Integration: How Interdependent are Eastern European Economies and the Euro Area?," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 138, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    3. Gerhard Fenz & Martin Schneider, 2008. "Transmission of business cycle shocks between the US and the euro area," Working Papers 145, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
    4. Prettner, Catherine & Prettner, Klaus, 2014. "How interdependent are Eastern European economies and the Euro area?," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 187, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    5. David Mortimer Krainz, 2011. "An Evaluation of the Forecasting Performance of Three Econometric Models for the Eurozone and the USA," WIFO Working Papers 399, WIFO.
    6. Mazurek, Jiří, 2014. "The evaluation of recession magnitudes in EU countries during the global financial crisis 2008-2010," MPRA Paper 56451, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Software components

    Sorry, no citations of software components recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 8 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (6) 2007-12-15 2017-03-12 2019-11-25 2019-12-16 2020-01-20 2020-06-08. Author is listed
  2. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (4) 2019-11-25 2019-12-16 2020-01-20 2020-06-08
  3. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (3) 2019-11-25 2019-12-16 2020-06-08
  4. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (2) 2019-11-25 2020-06-08
  5. NEP-ICT: Information & Communication Technologies (2) 2015-07-04 2020-01-20
  6. NEP-TID: Technology & Industrial Dynamics (2) 2019-11-25 2020-06-08
  7. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2007-12-15
  8. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2007-12-15
  9. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2015-07-04
  10. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2014-05-09

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