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Jason Dean

Personal Details

First Name:Jason
Middle Name:
Last Name:Dean
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pde913
http://jason-dean.ca

Affiliation

(80%) Pilon School of Business
Sheridan College

Brampton, Canada
https://www.sheridancollege.ca/academics/faculties/business.aspx
RePEc:edi:sbshcca (more details at EDIRC)

(20%) Department of Economics
School of Business and Economics
Wilfrid Laurier University

Waterloo, Canada
http://www.wlu.ca/homepage.php?grp_id=491
RePEc:edi:sbwluca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Jason Dean, 2018. "Does it matter if immigrants work in jobs related to their education?," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 8(1), pages 1-42, December.
  2. Jason Dean & Maryam Dilmaghani, 2016. "Economic Integration of Pre-WWI Immigrants from the British Isles in the Canadian Labour Market," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 55-76, February.
  3. Maryam Dilmaghani & Jason Dean, 2016. "Religiosity and female labour market attainment in Canada: the Protestant exception," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(3), pages 244-262, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Jason Dean, 2018. "Does it matter if immigrants work in jobs related to their education?," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 8(1), pages 1-42, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Kimberly Wong, 2020. "The Improved Labour Market Performance of New Immigrants to Canada, 2006-2019," CSLS Research Reports 2020-03, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.

  2. Jason Dean & Maryam Dilmaghani, 2016. "Economic Integration of Pre-WWI Immigrants from the British Isles in the Canadian Labour Market," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 55-76, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Kris Inwood & Chris Minns & Fraser Summerfield, 2016. "Reverse assimilation? Immigrants in the Canadian labour market during the Great Depression," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(3), pages 299-321.
    2. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Platt Boustan, 2016. "Immigration in American Economic History," NBER Working Papers 21882, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Gillian C. Hamilton & Ian Keay & Frank D. Lewis, 2017. "Contributions to Canadian economic history: The last 30 years," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 50(5), pages 1632-1657, December.

  3. Maryam Dilmaghani & Jason Dean, 2016. "Religiosity and female labour market attainment in Canada: the Protestant exception," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(3), pages 244-262, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Fischer, Justina A.V. & Pastore, Francesco, 2015. "Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis: religion and female employment over time," MPRA Paper 65645, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Oscar Zapata, 2018. "Turning to God in Tough Times? Human Versus Material Losses from Climate Disasters in Canada," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 259-281, October.
    3. Eman Abdelhadi & Paula England, 2018. "Do Values Explain the Low Employment Levels of Muslim Women Around the World? A Within-and between-Country Analysis," Working Papers 20180015, New York University Abu Dhabi, Department of Social Science, revised Mar 2018.
    4. Maryam Dilmaghani, 2017. "Religiosity and Labour Earnings in Canadian Provinces," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 82-99, March.

More information

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

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